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Thread: A Historically Minded Guide of Structure and Marching! By 1st EPI Heinrich

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    A Historically Minded Guide of Structure and Marching! By 1st EPI Heinrich


    Volume I


    Introduction:
    Hello! Welcome to the Mount&Blade: NW War College! The Purpose of this guide is to provide a resource to regiment leaders, who might not have any background knowledge of the marching commands or structure of an infantry unit, a source of information and reference for historically oriented drill commands and military structure.

    This guide has been compiled by experts over the years from the 1st East Prussian Infantry and community for use during special events and parades, but this information is being made public for the benefit of the community. The maneuvers and tactics covered in these manuals are based on contemporary manuals of the period, and adapted only to the extent required to ensure their practicality in the engine limitations of Mount & Blade, and to the scale and organizational structure of regiments within the community.



    The Mount&Blade: NW War College will be divided into 7 sections for easy reference.

    1. Necessary Vocabulary
    This will define and explain the terms used throughout the entire guide

    2. The Organization of the Company
    The Company is the basic unit of structure during this time period. This section will detail the proper structure of an Infantry company of the era, and proper placement of Officers and NCO's in the Line.

    3. Command Types
    Understanding the different command types will make carrying out each of the following schools much easier. Each command taught in this guide will follow the same pattern explained in this section.

    4. The School of the Soldier
    The School of the Soldier includes pertinent information for individual duties and responsibilities within the line of the ranker. It is absolutely necessary that each soldier understand these duties and responsibilities, and be able to perform them without thinking in a disciplined and uniform manner. The success or failure in battle can rely on the basic knowledge of a soldier in his ability to perform his duty

    5. The School of the Company
    The School of the Company is meant to provide information for proper movement of Platoon and Company sized units on the field of battle. Proper control of the formation is necessary for the most efficient performance of the Company. These movements are meant to be completed while acting within a single formation. This formation may either be referred to as a Platoon or Company, based on the size of the unit.

    6. The School of the Battalion
    The School of the Battalion is meant for large units with movement of multiple Company formations, while all remaining in a single line. The division and structure of the battalion is complex, but movement is very similar to the School of the Company. The School of the Battalion projects the movements performed at the company level on a larger scale, with many more moving parts.

    7. External Resources
    This short section will contain a list and link of resources that were used to create these manuals. In addition to this list of resources, there are PDF Downloads for Each of the Schools.
    [hr]
    [hr]



    [size=16pt]1. Necessary Vocabulary [/size]
    File-Closer? Covering Sergeant? Guide? What does it all mean?! Don't Stress! This section will define these unknown terms and help to create an image of what each means.


















    Battalion
    The term "Battalion" refers to a unit of military structure. a "Battalion" is comprised of multiple companies, and is generally led by either a Lieutenant Colonel or a Major. See "Chief of Battalion."

    Chief of Battalion
    This refers to the officer in overall control of the battalion and its movements. Generally a Lieutenant Colonel, or Major depending on the size of the battalion.

    CO
    Abbreviated way of Stating "Commanding Officer." The CO is the senior most officer in charge of the Unit. Depending on the size of your regiment or unit, the rank of your CO may vary.

    Column of Files
    The term used to describe a unit of soldiers aligned back to chest.

    Company
    A military unit of organization comprised of multiple platoons, typically led by a captain. In some large units, multiple companies can be attached to form a Battalion.

    Covering Sergeant
    A Covering sergeant is the senior NCO In the formation who takes his place in line in the same file as the guide, behind the guide. Should the guide fall in combat, the Covering sergeant is able to take his place and assume command of the formation with ease.

    File
    The term used to describe a set of 2 soldiers. The one standing in the front rank, as well as the one standing in the rear rank, directly behind the person in the first.

    File-Closer
    A File-Closer is generally an NCO who stands behind the formation, and corrects minor errors in alignment and dressing during battle.

    Guide
    In formation, the "guide" refers to the person who is currently at the head of the formation. This is the person who the formation would align to. This can be either an Officer or Non Commissioned officer depending on the situation.

    Line / Line of Battle
    The term used to describe a formation of soldiers aligned shoulder to shoulder

    NCO
    Abbreviated form of "Non Commissioned Officer." A Corporal, Sergeant, and First Sergeant are examples of Non Commissioned Officers.

    Platoon
    The Smallest unit of military structure addressed throughout this guide. A platoon is generally led by either a first or second lieutenant, and is attached to other platoons, comprising a "Company."

    Rank
    A Line of Battle is comprised of 2 or more ranks. A Rank is a row of soldiers standing shoulder to shoulder from right to left.

    Ranker
    The generic term used to describe each individual footman. These are your musket carrying troops. Rank varies. For the purpose of this guide, the term ranker will be used interchangeably with "Private."

    Unit
    For the purpose of this manual, the term unit is used to describe a formation of infantry. This can be either a platoon or company.

    XO
    Abbreviated way of stating "Executive Officer." The XO is the second senior most officer in charge of the unit. Like the CO, depending on the size of your regiment or unit, the rank of your XO may vary. The XO is very concerned with the administration of the unit, and acts as the chief of staff for battalion sized units and larger.



    b]2. The Organization of a Company [/b][/size]
    A full strength company should be compromised of no less than two platoons of infantry and should on paper consist of:
    • [li]1 Captain (The Commanding officer of the Company)[/li]
      [li]1 First Lieutenant (The Executive officer of the Company and Leader of the 2nd Platoon)[/li]
      [li]1-3 Second Lieutenant(s) (Dependant on the number of platoons) (Additional Platoon Leaders)[/li]
      [li]1 First Sergeant (Primary NCO, Aid to the Captain and Primary File-Closer)[/li]
      [li]4-12 Sergeants (2-3 Per Platoon)[/li]
      [li]4-12 Corporals (2-3 Per Platoon)[/li]
      [li]36+ Privates (18+ Per Platoon)[/li]


    A Platoon of Infantry Formed in Line of Battle

    Figure 2.1

    On the low end, each platoon should be able to field at least 1 Officer, 2 Sergeants, and 10 Privates (Rankers). If the platoons are unable to meet this number, they should not be formed by half-companies, but rather form as a single single formation. Therefore, a platoon must maintain a frontage of at least 5 files, not including the Officer and covering Sergeant's file.


    Figure 2.2


    The Jobs in line explained

    The Company Commander / Captain

    The Captain generally at the head of the Company's 1st Platoon, acts as the "Driver" of the Company, and directly oversees and guides it. He is to form it, maneuver it, and either directly or generally, issue firing orders. Once in position, he may step out and allow the platoon leaders to take direct control of their platoons while he observes and guides the general situation - either observing and directing fire, or coordinating with the battalion leadership. Upon stepping out of his position and handing off control, or upon his death, he should always make this known, and have the next in command (generally first platoon's Lieutenant) take his place at the head of the Company, right of the first rank of the first platoon. Should the Company need to move out, the Captain should immediately resume his place at the head of 1st Platoon, and any Officer or Non Commissioned Officer filling in for him should return to his file-closing position



    The Company's Executive Officer / First Lieutenant

    At the head of the company's 2nd platoon, is a first lieutenant, the company's executive officer. He is in direct command of 2nd platoon, and positioned on furthest to the right of the platoon. He is in charge of maneuvering 2nd platoon, and directing its fire. He is under the direct command of his company's captain. Under certain circumstances, he may take the initiative and issue orders to maneuver and give fire, but will generally receive these orders at the company level.



    The Second Lieutenant / Platoon leaders

    At the head of the company's 1st platoon, is a second lieutenant. If the Captain chooses to act as the guide for 1st Platoon, the second lieutenant platoon leader may also take position in the file-closing rank, in the right-most file behind the guide and covering Sergeant of his platoon. His duty is to ensure order and accept leadership and responsibility for the company's 1st platoon.



    The 1st Sergeant

    At the Company level, the 1st Sergeant is in overall charge of discipline. He is to ensure that orders be carried out, and that both rankers and the Non Commissioned Officers are doing their jobs. He should be well acquainted with the proper positions and duties of each of these, and work to make sure they are met. He is also to assist in observation, and may occasionally be employed to scout or lead detachments. In the unfortunate event that all officers be killed, he is next in command of the Company.



    The Sergeant

    At the Platoon level, Sergeants fill two important roles:

    1) The first is that of the covering Sergeant. Placed directly behind the leading Officer of the platoon (first or second lieutenant), he is charged with acting as the right guide when an officer steps out of line or is killed, and in the absence or death of all officers in his Platoon, command of it falls to him. He may also be employed to scout ahead of the platoon on the march, or to lead a small detachment of files to confront a threat in the place of an officer or the company's first sergeant.

    2) All remaining Sergeants will act as file-closers. The chief among them is the left-most file-closer, who stands one pace behind the last file of the platoon, and steps up to act as the left guide when needed. The next in line is the right-most file closer. He stands 1 pace behind the platoon's first ranker file. In the 1st platoon, this position is reserved for the first sergeant. Both file-closers are charged with observing the formation and assuring its effectiveness. They are to command the line to dress, and to make sure every man steps up into and maintains his proper position. When soldiers are not responding or are acting sluggishly, they are to repeat the Officer's orders and reinforce his authority.

    - To keep the line intact, Sergeants are also expected to step forward and protect the formation from lone individuals or cavalrymen threatening to break it by engaging the line in melee. Upon heavy casualties, the file-closing sergeants may join the line at the order of an officer or the first sergeant, but should always be posted in their proper positions during initial deployment.

    - The positions of absent sergeants should be filled by Corporals, who otherwise stand in the left-most ranker file of their platoon.





    [hr]
    [hr]
    [size=10pt]Section 2a: when the Battalion is formed by Whole-Companies[/size]
    In instances when the battalion is formed, each pair of platoon's in each company shall be pulled together as a single formation, lead by its Captain. The battalion then operates in a manner similar with its companies as each individual company would operate with its platoons.


    Figure 2.3

    The Chief of Battalion (either a Lieutenant Colonel, or Major in direct command), issues orders as found in The School of the Battalion, to all of his companies. His orders may be of a direct or general nature. It is his job to observe the battlefield, and maneuver the Battalion. For this purpose, he may employ the most Senior Captain at the head of the 1st company to assist in maneuvering the Battalion - particularly when the Battalion is en-route, and he is concerning himself with where it is to be formed.

    At the head of every company, and assisted by a junior officer (ranked Second Lieutenant), is a Captain. The Captain is in direct command of his company, and is positioned to the right of his first platoon's first rank during formation and maneuvers. Once the company is halted and in position, or exchanging fire, the Captain may remove himself from the head of the 1st Platoon in his company, his position being replaced by the platoon's Lieutenant or covering Sergeant, and position himself behind the Company, from which he may observe and direct its fire, and coordinate with the Chief of Battalion. Should the Company prepare to move, he will reposition himself at the head of 1st Platoon, and the file-closing Lieutenant or covering Sergeant previously replacing him will return to his original position. He is under the direct command of the Chief of Battalion. He may take the initiative and issue orders to maneuver and give fire, but will generally receive these orders at the Battalion level.






    3. Types of Commands [/size]
    Commands are issued in two parts.

    The preparatory command, which alerts the unit that a command is about to be given, and indicates the movement or action which is to be executed

    The command of execution, such as MARCH. This is the second part of the command that warrants the response from the unit.

    In the following example, we'll examine the command "Right, FACE" :

    The command "Right, FACE" instructs the individuals in a unit to turn 90 degress toward the right. The leader of the formation would give the preparatory command "Right," which alerts the unit of an upcoming movement, and following a short pause would emphasize the command of execution "FACE." Only after hearing the command of execution should the unit perform the movement.

    Throughout this Guide, all commands will be set apart from their explanations and centered. The full command will be in bold. A comma will follow the preparatory command, and the command of execution will be in all caps. Example:

    Right, FACE
    This command instructs the individuals in a unit to perform a 90 degree turn to the right.

    Some commands include the size of the unit (Example: Platoon, Company, Battalion). These instances will be left with a , and it should be understood that the user should fill in the size of their unit when issuing the command. Example:

    Right Wheel, MARCH
    If you were leading a company sized unit, this command would be read as:

    Company , Right Wheel, MARCH




    4. The School of the Soldier [/size]
    Note: Topics discussed within "The School of the Soldier," are recommendations based on years of practice and historical research. The needs of your unit may be different, and the ideas presented in this section may not necessarily apply to you.


    PRESERVING ORDER IN LINE OF BATTLE FORMATIONS
    ***
    1. Individuals positioned in the front rank should always dress to, and keep close track of the person to their right. During maneuvers, this is the person whom you follow. You are to stay next to him – never running ahead of him, and always halting by his side. Keep track of him, and concern yourself with no other individual.

    2. Individuals positioned in the rear rank should always dress behind the first rank of their file. Your job is simple; keep track of the guy in front of you. Leave sufficient space between him and yourself during maneuvers, and when the line comes to a stop, wait for him to dress properly, and then take up position directly behind him. Ensure that you have stepped all the way up behind, and are lightly touching the person in front of you.

    SPACING IN LINE OF BATTLE FORMATIONS
    ***
    When dressing in a line, a little space – about a man’s width, should always be left between you and the person to your right. This gap should be large enough for a person to squeeze through, but should not be any larger. In some instances, depending on the event or situation, an officer may call for less spacing; typically of a man’s width. In this case, soldiers should dress to the right creating only enough space for each to have a little “wiggle room,” but not to establish any gaps large enough through which a person could walk:



    Figure 4.1



    The ability to maintain proper spacing is important for a number of reasons:
    • [li]It prevents crowding and collision of files when moving in formation[/li]
      [li]It prevents team-killing the person next to you when thrusting with the bayonet[/li]
      [li]It makes for a slightly less dense target, and covers slightly more ground.[/li]
      [li]It allows the rear ranks a greater range of fire[/li]

    When dressing right, you should only be concerned with the space between yourself and the man to your right – try always to maintain this proper spacing.

    WHEN FIRING FROM THE REAR RANK
    ***
    Generally, the front rank should not kneel except in certain circumstances in which the express order to do so is given. When in two ranks, fire will should be given with both ranks standing. The rear ranks will shoot over the shoulders of the front franks. When both ranks are aiming, this is how it should look:



    Figure 4.2

    Figure 4.3



    Take note that in Figure 4.2 the rear rank's left foot is directly behind the first rank's right foot.

    Notice in Figure 4.3, In first person, the barrel of the musket clears the elbow. This is not necessary, and you can actually fire through the elbow without causing injury, given that you are on semi-level ground, and not aiming severely downwards. However, if the line is deployed on an inverse slope, and the front rank is significantly positioned above the rear rank, firing through the elbow will kill the man in the front rank. Therefore, great care should be taken when the line is deployed on an inverse slope – either the first rank should be knelt in this specific situation or the rear rank should not fire – or, it should fire only with great care to clear the first rank. In all other circumstances, firing in two ranks standing is to be regarded as safe and superior.

    ON THE USE OF CROUCHING
    ***
    In Mount & Blade: Napoleonic Wars, it is common practice among less professional soldiers to crouch while in formation. Unless deployed in skirmish order, no soldier shall ever kneel unless given the explicit order to do so. We are to stand tall, and project our presence on the field – all while remaining a mobile formation. Every soldier should be ready to move at all times without hesitation.

    It is recommended that the use of crouching be limited to:
    • [li]Kneeling the first rank on command when in a line 3-ranks deep[/li]
      [li]Kneeling the first rank on command when on an inverse slope[/li]
      [li]Kneeling the first or outer ranks on command when combating cavalry[/li]
      [li]Kneeling at will only when deployed as skirmishers. Note that shots should be taken while standing to avoid loss of accurate aim that results from firing knelt (as this offsets the bullet’s trajectory relative to your crosshair).[/li]






    5. The School of the Company [/size]
    Note: The Commands and ideas explained within "The School of the Company," are recommendations based on years of practice and historical research. Each of these movements can be performed while in a single rank line, but all are explained as if operating in two. The needs of your unit may be different, and ideas presented throughout this section may not necessarily apply to you.

    MARCHING STEPS OF THE COMPANY
    ***

    Forward, Common time, MARCH
    This type of marching is the most simple, and the default moving pace. The common time is a brisk walking pace; if any order of speed is not given during the marching command, common time is to be assumed.

    Double time, MARCH
    At this command, the unit should unanimously switch from the common time to the double time. This type of marching is at a faster, but manageable way of moving in a column. This type of marching is ideally not ordered from a standing, halted position.

    FORMATION OF THE COMPANY LINE
    ***



    Figure 5.1

    Guides, POST
    On this command, the platoon leader of each platoon takes his spot in the company or battalion line, from right to left, according to the number of his platoon. Room for 6-9 files to form, depending on the size of the platoon/Company, is to be left between each guide

    ,FALL-IN
    At this order, every soldier falls in, building each file in two ranks from the right to left, to the left of their platoon leader. Two korporalen shall be placed on either side of the platoon for purposes of guiding the rankers while in line with minor details. The covering and file-closing sergeants take up their respective positions once the ranks have been formed. Any reserve officers attached to the platoons (this generally being a Leutnant) stand to the right of the 1st file-closing sergeant, and behind the covering sergeant. See Figure 5.1




    [hr]
    [size=10pt]Section 5a: Movements in a Line of Battle[/size]

    ADVANCEMENT IN LINE OF BATTLE
    ***

    Guide Right, Forward, MARCH
    At this, the Captain or Covering Sergeant steps off. Each file successively steps off with, and follows closely the next, with every man in the front rank dressing closely off of the man to his right. This movement is demonstrated below in Figure 5.2.


    Figure 5.2



    TO ADVANCE IN LINE OF BATTLE BY THE LEFT GUIDE
    ***



    Figure 5.3


    Guide Left, Forward
    Upon command, the left-most file closing Sergeant takes up position in the first rank, on the left side of the company.

    MARCH
    At the word MARCH, the left-most file steps off, followed by each successive file, and the Company advances forward with each file dressing off of the one to its left. The NCO in the front rank of the left-most file of the Platoon or Company is charged with the direction of the march.




    TO BRING THE LINE TO A HALT
    ***

    ,HALT
    On this order, the leading file comes to a halt, and each successive file comes on to line dressing off of the previous one. Every file should already be dressed as it comes on to line to avoid the need to have the entire company right dress.


    Figure 5.4



    TO MARCH BY THE OBLIQUE IN LINE OF BATTLE
    ***

    Right (or Left) Oblique, MARCH
    The platoon advances in the same manner as the forward march, but strafes right or left while marching forward. In Mount&Blade, this is achieved by holding down both W, and A (if by the left oblique) or D (if by the right oblique). When marching by the left oblique, the guide must be left. When marching by the right oblique, it must be right. Figure 5.5 demonstrates marching in the right oblique.


    Figure 5.5



    WHEELING A HALTED LINE OF BATTLE
    ***



    Figure 5.6

    Right (or Left) Wheel
    At this order, the right or left guide faces the direction of the wheel and blocks up with his weapon to mark the angle.

    MARCH
    The files move up onto line and realign themselves. If the guide and wheel is right, the files step off from right to left, and dress right. If the guide is left, the files step off from left to right, and dress left. The guide should match the direction of the wheel, and be called upon a left wheel.




    COUNTER-WHEELING LEFT OR RIGHT WHILE HALTED
    ***

    Right (or Left) Counter-Wheel, MARCH
    See "Wheeling a Halted line of Battle" for instructions. This will bring the Platoon in a 180 Degree wheel facing the Platoon in the opposite direction then previously.



    WHEELING A MOVING LINE OF BATTLE
    ***

    Right (or Left) Wheel, MARCH
    The Platoon or Company, while marching forward, can conduct a left or right wheel on the move. The guide signals the wheel by the orders, turns to the specified direction, with each successive file following. During this exercise, the guide does not change. Both right and left wheels are conducted with the guide preserved. When wheeling inward of the guide, care should be taken by the inside files to slow down and react with sufficient promptness so as to avoid collision, and the guide should avoid wheeling quickly and at sharp angles.



    Figure 5.7

    [hr]
    [size=10pt]Section 5b: Movements in a Column of Files[/size]

    LINE OF BATTLE INTO COLUMN OF FILES
    ***

    Starting from the Line of Battle
    Right (or Left), FACE
    Forward, MARCH
    The column steps off, to the best of his ability, maintain his position in line and end in the same rank and file from which he started. The forward-most man in the second rank should take care never to step up beside an Officer or Sergeant. Should this happen, he should fall out and rejoin the end of the second rank.

    HALT
    The column halts. In order to retain proper spacing, each pair should stop just short of the pair in front of it, and those in the rear (now right) rank should take care to align themselves shoulder to shoulder with their partner to the left.




    Figure 5.8




    TO MARCH BY FILES LEFT OR RIGHT IN COLUMN
    ***

    By File Left (Or Right), MARCH
    This command indicates a sharp (90 degree) right or left turn while marching. The inside rank should slow down, and take care not to collide with or out-run the outer rank or space out the column.


    Figure 5.9



    FLANKING INTO LINE OF BATTLE FROM COLUMN OF FILES
    ***
    By the Right (or Left) Flank
    This is to be done when simply right-facing a column of files into line would cause the line to be inverted, or to fix such an inversion.
    The Platoon Leader steps forward, faces to the right, and marches forward past the Covering Sergeant, who quickly follows him. The Files stand fast waiting for the order to march.

    MARCH
    The files march forward, face right, and step up into line, rebuilding the line from right to left. The guide is right, and every man in the left-most rank should find himself behind the man previously to his right. The File-Closers stay their ground, and wait until the platoon is formed to retake their positions.



    Figure 5.10



    COUNTER MARCHING A COLUMN OF FILES
    ***
    Countermarch, By File Left (or Right), MARCH
    This command indicates a sharp 180 degree turn to the right or left in a column of files only. As the column comes up to the turn of direction, the men on the inside should briefly slow down to avoid staggering the ranks.



    Figure 5.11



    TO DEPLOY BY FILES FORWARD INTO LINE
    ***



    Figure 5.12


    ,By Into Line
    This is to be done when the Platoon or Company, marching by the flank in a column of files, need quickly to be brought forward into a line of battle. At this command, the officer will stand fast at the head of the column, in front of the left-most rank, and raising his sword to indicate the line on which the files will form giving the command of execution:

    MARCH
    Each file, one after the next, maintaining their facing, marches up and on-to line, rebuilding each file from the right to the left




    6. The School of the Battalion[/size]

    MARCHING STEPS OF THE BATTALION
    ***

    Forward, Common time, MARCH
    This type of marching is the most simple, and the default moving pace. The common time is a brisk walking pace; if any order of speed is not given during the marching command, common time is to be assumed.

    Double time, MARCH
    At this command, the unit should unanimously switch from the common time to the double time. This type of marching is at a faster, but manageable way of moving in a column. This type of marching is ideally not ordered from a standing, halted position.

    FORMATION OF THE COMPANY LINE
    ***



    Figure 6.1

    Guides, POST
    On this command, the platoon leader of each platoon takes his spot in the company or battalion line, from right to left, according to the number of his platoon. Room for 6-9 files to form, depending on the size of the platoon/Company, is to be left between each guide

    ,FALL-IN
    At this order, every soldier falls in, building each file in two ranks from the right to left, to the left of their platoon leader. Two Corporals shall be placed on either side of the platoon for purposes of guiding the privates while in line with minor details. The covering and file-closing sergeants take up their respective positions once the ranks have been formed. Any reserve officers attached to the platoons (this generally being a Second Lieutenant) stand to the right of the 1st file-closing sergeant, and behind the covering sergeant. See Figure 6.1


    FORMATION OF THE BATTALION LINE
    ***

    Once the Companies are formed and ready, the Battalion Commander will sound for the Companies to form together in one single "Line of Battle", with the order:

    Companies, FORM BATTALION
    Once this order is given, two of the three companies, (excluding the Color Company or Second Company prescribed before the battle) shall find the Color Company as their guides and dress onto their Line, forming the Battalion Line.


    Figure 6.2

    [hr]
    Section 6a: Movements in a Line of Battle

    ADVANCEMENT IN LINE OF BATTLE
    ***

    Battalion, Forward
    This is the preparatory command. At this point, the Color Guard, (composed of three men, two flanking a Standard Bearer) shall take six steps forwards in front of the Battalion line and hold fast.

    MARCH
    At this, the entire formation shall step off simultaneously with the advanced Color Guard keeping it's six pace distance. Each file and rank dressing each other to keep close formation, but also keeping a gap in between the Second and Third Company for the Color Guard to post back in to. (This is the only Forward Marching order where the Color Guard will advance first.)

    Figure 6.3

    ADVANCEMENT IN LINE OF BATTLE BY THE RIGHT GUIDE
    ***

    Battalion, Forward. Guide right.
    Upon command, the right-most Company Commander, on the right side of the Battalion shall take his place; if not already posted, in the right-most front rank file.

    MARCH.
    At the word MARCH, the right-most file steps off, followed by each successive file, and the Battalion advances forward with each file dressing off of the one to it's right. The Captain in the front rank of the right-most file of the First Company is charged with the direction of the march. (Only used sparingly.)


    Figure 6.4


    ADVANCEMENT IN LINE OF BATTLE BY THE LEFT GUIDE
    ***

    Guide Left, Forward
    Upon command, the left-most Company Commander, on the left side of the Battalion shall order a Sergeant to the left-most front rank file; if not already posted, in the right-most front rank file.

    MARCH
    At the word MARCH, the left-most file steps off, followed by each successive file, and the Battalion advances forward with each file dressing off of the one to it's left. The Sergeant in the front rank of the left-most file of the Third Company is charged with the direction of the march. (Only used sparingly.)


    Figure 6.5

    TO BRING THE LINE TO A HALT
    ***

    Battalion, HALT
    On this order, the Battalion comes to a halt , and each Company comes on to line dressing off of the Second Company. Every file and rank should already be dressed as it comes on to line to avoid the need to have the entire Battalion to dress.

    Guides, Post.
    At this time, the Color Guard that is still advanced shall take it's place back into the formation.


    Figure 6.6


    TO RETIRE IN LINE OF BATTLE
    ***

    Battalion, About, FACE.
    At the command, FACE, the entire formation shall turn to the right, 180 degrees and march off in the new prescribed direction.

    TO MARCH BY THE RIGHT OR LEFT OBLIQUE IN LINE OF BATTLE
    ***

    Right (or left) Oblique, MARCH
    The Battalion advances in the same manner as the forward march, but strafes right or left while marching forward. In Mount&Blade Napoleonic Wars, this is achieved by holding down both W, and A (if by the left oblique) or D (if by the right oblique). When marching by the left oblique, the guide must be left. When marching by the right oblique, it must be right.

    Forward, MARCH
    To correct the oblique march from the previous order's direction the Commander shall order a forward march.


    Figure 6.7


    WHEELING A HALTED LINE OF BATTLE
    ***

    Battalion, Right (or left) Wheel
    At this order, the right or left guide of the Battalion faces the direction of the wheel and blocks up with his weapon to mark the angle of 90 degrees.

    MARCH
    The files move up onto line and realign themselves. If the guide and wheel is right, the files step off from right to left, and dress right. If the guide is left, the files step off from left to right, and dress left. The guide should match the direction of the wheel, and be called upon a left wheel.


    Figure 6.8

    WHEELING A MOVING LINE OF BATTLE
    ***

    Battalion, right (or left) wheel, MARCH
    The Battalion, while marching forward, can conduct a left or right wheel on the move. The guide signals the wheel by the orders, turns to the specified direction, with each successive file following. During this exercise, the Color Guard shall immediately fall back into place inside the line. Both right and left wheels are conducted with the new guide (right or left) prescribed by the order. When wheeling, care should be taken by the inside files to slow down and react with sufficient promptness so as to avoid collision, and the guide should avoid wheeling quickly and at sharp angles. A small stop shall be made to make sure that the line is in order with the Color Guard moving forward six paces once more, and the command of "Forward, March." being stated to continue.

    [Reference Figure 6.8]

    [hr]
    Section 6b: Movements in a Column of Files


    LINE OF BATTLE INTO A COLUMN OF FILES
    ***
    Starting from the Line of Battle

    Figure 6.9

    Battalion, Right (or left), FACE
    .
    Forward, MARCH
    The column steps off, to the best of his ability, maintain his position in line and end in the same rank and file from which he started. The forward-most man in the second rank should take care never to step up beside an Officer or Sergeant. Should this happen, he should fall out and rejoin the end of his (or her) Company.

    Figure 6.9a


    HALT.
    The column halts. In order to retain proper spacing, each pair should stop just short of the pair in front of it, and those in the rear (now right) rank should take care to align themselves shoulder to shoulder with their partner to the left.


    TO MARCH BY FILES LEFT OR RIGHT IN COLUMN OF FILES
    ***

    Figure 6.10

    By File Left (or right), MARCH
    Indicates a sharp (90 degree) right or left turn while marching. The inside rank should slow down, and take care not to collide with or out-run the outer rank or space out the column.


    FLANKING INTO LINE OF BATTLE FROM A COLUMN OF FILES
    ***

    Battalion, By the Right (or left) Flank,
    This is to be done when simply right-facing a column of files into line would cause the line to be inverted, or to fix such an inversion.
    The steps forward, faces to the right, and marches forward past the Covering Sergeant, who quickly follows him. The Files stand fast waiting for the order to march.

    MARCH
    The files march forward, face right, and step up into line, rebuilding the line from right to left. The guide is right, and every man in the left-most rank should find himself behind the man previously to his right. The File-Closers stay their ground, and wait until the platoon is formed to retake their positions.


    Figure 6.11



    COUNTER MARCHING A COLUMN OF FILES
    ***

    Countermarch, By File Left (or right), MARCH
    This command indicates a sharp 180 degree turn to the right or left in a column of files only. As the column comes up to the turn of direction, the men on the inside should briefly slow down to avoid staggering the ranks.

    [This may also be achieved with two timed "By File Right (or Left)" commands; at the Commander's discretion.]


    Figure 6.12


    TO DEPLOY BY FILES FORWARD INTO LINE
    ***
    By Battalion into Line,
    This is to be done when the Battalion, marching by the flank in a column of files, need quickly to be brought forward into a line of battle. At this command, the Battalion commander or Company commander will stand fast at the head of the column, in front of the left-most rank, and raising his sword to indicate the line on which the files will form, give the command:

    MARCH
    Each file, one after the next, maintaining their facing forward, march up and on-to line, rebuilding each file from the right to the left of the Officer.


    Figure 6.13


    FIRING WITH THE BATTALION
    ***

    Since the Battalion needs it's flag to hold itself together with dressing and keeping general order of whom is whom, great care must be taken for it's Color Guard within the Second Company. The Color Guard will post itself in the Rear Rank of the line, so that it is out of relative harm. The Battalion's officers for which orders are given to from the Commander to the men are also very important. At any order of firing commands the Commanding Company Officer must post themselves in the rear of the line in the approximate middle of their line, in which the Covering Sergeant or Junior Officer shall take his place. Once firing is done, or a movement order is given; all Officers and Color Guards will re-post themselves to their positions once more.

    Here is the diagram of the Battalion line:

    Figure 6.14




    7. External Resources[/size]

    Infantry Manuals
    Below is a compilation of Military Manuals of the era, from which we have adapted our guide.

    Gilham's Manual - American Civil War

    Cooper's Volunteer Manual - American Civil War

    French 1791 Drill Manual

    British 1816 Drill Manual

    German 1806 Manual

    Internet Resource - Organization of the Prussian Infantry

    [hr]
    On the External Use of THIS GUIDE
    This Information has been made public for the use of the community. Please feel free to use any and all information contained within this guide. However, when doing so, please give credit where its due. Many people have spent a long time compiling and writing this information, and they deserve the credit for their hard work. Thanks!

    [hr]
    Credits:
    • [li]OberstLeutnant Argus (Ret): Argus is a Historical enthusiast. Argus published the first Infantry drill manuals, which have been adapted into this guide. He took the time to read through, translating the foreign manuals and studying how historical drill can be implemented into the Mount & Blade environment.[/li]
      [li]Bataillon-Adjutant L. Hopper: The Modern Keeper of the Manuals. Hopper is a very active historical re-enactor, and is very familiar with the proper line drill of the era. Hopper has been responsible for the maintenance and upkeep of these field manuals throughout the years. [/li]
      [li]The 1st East Prussian Infantry: The Test Dummies. Argus experimented and developed these manuals with the 1st EPI, who took the historical principles and ran with them.
    Last edited by RhettVito; 02-11-2017 at 10:07 PM.

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    Posted with permission from 1st EPI Gunny

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    What purpose does this serve?

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    Drill written very good for people who have a hard time understanding the double rank drill.


    .

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    It is convoluted and has extraneous details that to the common Oik of the online gaming community cannot and choose not to comprehend. I understand both what the 1st EPI and yourself are trying to instill in these people but if the average Joe has to do too much thinking and work for something he does in his free time then he will A.) Get burned out quick B.) Leave the Community and never return. or C.) Do whatever the heck he wants because no one can force him otherwise. It is rare to actually find anyone willing to try to get thinks Parade ground perfect in a video game. Game mechanics and availability of time prevents most Historical maneuvers and evolutions as people get frustrated easily when try to perform tasks, which to trained individuals like ourselves, find easy in the real world. An Example of this would be a standard count off and right face into fours in real life takes about 30 minutes to get the hang of, in game one must hit a difficult combo of keys to event attempt to try something as complex. I am not bashing the game but in no way is this supposed to mirror real mechanics of life. We are limited by the engine and by the lack of freedom and instinct we have in real life. In real life we can do these maneuvers in game we may not be able to unless everyone accepts clumsiness and agree to persevere over time to try and accomplish it. I can load and fire 4 rammed shots a minute in real life in game I cannot and that is how it must be, just because you can do these things in real life does not mean you should or can do them in game.

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    Couldn't have said it any better Hall, people need to understand this is not real life or reenacting you will not get people doing most of what you posted Rhett. I understand what you are doing but if the avarge person playing a game has to spend more than 30min to an hour doing drill they are not going to play the game. This is one of the issues I have with some people "reenactors" mostly when it comes to the game they want things to be so realistic it will not be fun. Is a blunt way to put it being a reenactor myself. You will never get the historical accuracy they had during the civil war and I say this because it's not 1862. During the Maryland campaign. But even still it's a cool thread. Just had to rant a little

    - Kyle
    Last edited by Kyle422; 02-12-2017 at 06:50 AM.

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    ''Losers complain winners train'' That is the best why I can put this if they don't train and go up against a well-trained unit and get destroyed then well it is their own fought.
    Last edited by RhettVito; 02-12-2017 at 07:40 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RhettVito View Post
    ''Losers complain winners train'' That is the best why I can put this if they don't train and go up against a well-trained unit and get destroyed then well it is their own fought.
    They aren't really talking about winning or losing. They're making the point that most gamers won't have the patience or desire to go into this level of detail. Interesting material either way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by yoyo8346 View Post
    They aren't really talking about winning or losing. They're making the point that most gamers won't have the patience or desire to go into this level of detail. Interesting material either way.
    This is very well put together but I fully agree with Hall. Not even the 42nd is going to go for this level of over the top perfection. A lot of these moves are impractical in game, some need editing to work and only a few will be used as core movements by those companies with the drive and commitment.

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    Actually, these could work in game.

    Many have spoken about the feasiblity of "soft locking" troops into a formation.

    The illustrations here are clear and easily followed, and anyone with a bit of re-enacting under their belts can confirm the validity of these manouvers.

    All that needs done is for the developers to write them in.

    (Yeah I know, easier said than done. )

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