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Thread: Richmond Howitzers Battalion

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    Richmond Howitzers Battalion

    Join the Richmond Howitzers Battalion today!
    An elite battalion, the Howitzers served with distinction from 1st Manassas to Appomattox during the Civil War, and are still active as the 111th Field Artillery in the Virginia National Guard.






    Apply for the Howitzers here!


    Apply for the Baltimore Artillery here!



    Main Battery

    Richmond Howitzers, 1st Company
    Commanding Officer: Capt. E. S. McCarthy

    Battlefield: West Woods | Against: Gorman's Brigade's
    Arms:
    2 10-pdr. Parrott
    2 6-pdr. Gun

    Attached

    Baltimore (MD) Artillery
    Commanding Officer at Sharpsburg: Capt. J. B. Brockenbrough

    Battlefield: West Woods & Dunker Church | Against: Gorman's Brigades and parts of Hookers Division
    Arms:
    1 3-in. Ordnance Rifle
    2 Blakely
    1 12-pdr. howitzer was of iron rather than the usual bronze, and was unique at the battle.



    Reserves

    Richmond Howitzers, 2nd Company Reserve
    Commanding Officer: Capt. D. Watson
    Arms:
    2 10-pdr. Parrott
    1 12-pdr. Howitzer
    1 6-pdr. Piece that could shoot Hotchkiss shells (After talks with Historical Adviser George Crecy this is probably a Blakely. Less Likely but also possible this could be a Wiard of which a few where captured from Union forces.)

    Richmond Howitzers, 3rd Company Reserve
    Commanding Officer: Capt. Benjamin H. Smith, Jr.
    Arms:
    2 10-pdr. Parrott
    1 12-pdr. Boat Howitzer
    1 12-pdr. Rifled Howitzer

    From the diary of a 3rd Company member
    [Before the 6th August 1862:
    1x 10 pdr. Parrot
    2x Boat Howitzer]

    August 6th.- Our Parrot gun was ordered to the south side of the James river about a week since, and we, as yet, have heard nothing from it. The second Company Howitzers left at the same time, and placed in the Third Company's charge their Rifled Howitzer. A few days ago since we exchanged one of our little brass boat howitzers for another 10 pound Parrot gun .... etc.

    2x 10 Pdr. Parrot
    1x Rifled Howitzer
    1x Boat Howitzer

    used up to and during Antietam september 1862




    10 pdr. Parrott Rifle



    Type: Rifled gun
    Rarity: Common
    Years of Manufacture: Between 1861 and 1865
    Tube Composition: Cast Iron, Wrought Iron Breech Band
    Bore Diameter: 2.9 inches (Model 1861); 3.0 inches (Model 1863)
    Rifling Type (US): 3 grooves, right hand gain twist
    Rifling Type (CS): 3 groves right hand twist, or 12 grooves left hand twist
    Standard Powder Charge: 1 lb. Black Powder
    Projectiles: 10 lb. solid bolt, case, common shell, cannister
    Effective Range (at 5): up to 1,900 yards (1.1 miles)
    Projectile Flight Time (at 5): about 8 seconds
    Max Range (at 35): 5,000 yards (2.8 miles)
    Projectile Flight Time (at 35): about 21 seconds
    Tube Length: 78 inches (US); 81 inches (CS)
    Tube Weight: 890 lbs. (US); 1,150 lbs. (CS)
    Total Weight (Gun & Carriage): 1,800 lbs. (US); 2,060 lbs. (CS)
    Carriage Type: No. 1 Field Carriage (900 lbs.), 57" wheels
    Horses Required to Pull: 6
    No. in North America: approx. 630
    Cost in 1862 Dollars: $180 (US); $ 300 (CS)
    Cost in 1865 Dollars: $187 (US); $3,000 (CS)
    Invented By: Robert Parker Parrott in 1860
    US Casting Foundry: West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, NY
    CS Casting Foundry: Tredegar Iron Works, Richmond, VA
    Special Notes: Easy to Manufacture, Inexpensive, Reliable, and Accurate to Shoot

    One famous U.S. inventor was a former West Point graduate and ordnance officer named Robert Parker Parrott.

    Robert Parker Parrott In 1836, Parrott resigned his rank of captain and went to work for the West Point Foundry at Cold Spring, New York. This foundry was a civilian operated business and Parrott, as a superintendent, was able to dedicate some forty years perfecting a rifled cannon and a companion projectile. By 1860, he had patented a new method of attaching the reinforcing band on the breech of a gun tube. Although he was not the first to attach a band to a tube, he was the first to use a method of rotating the tube while slipping the band on hot. This rotation, while cooling, caused the band to attach itself in place uniformly rather than in one or two places as was the common method, which allowed the band to sag in place. The 10-pounder Parrott was patented in 1861 and the 20- and 30-pounder guns followed in 1861. He quickly followed up these patents by producing 6.4-, 8-, and 10-inch caliber cannons early in the war. The Army referred to these as 100, 200, and 300-pounder Parrotts respectively. By the end of the conflict the Parrott gun was being used extensively in both armies


    6-pdr. Gun



    Type: Smoothbore gun
    Rarity: Common to Uncommon
    Years of Manufacture: 1841 to 1863
    Tube Composition: Bronze or cast iron
    Bore Diameter: 3.67 inches
    Standard Powder Charge: 1.25 lbs.
    Projectiles: Solid shot (6.1 lb), spherical case, common shell, and cannister
    Effective Range (at 5): up to 1,523 yards
    Tube Length: 60 inches
    Tube Weight: 884 lbs.
    Carriage Type: No. 1 Field Carriage (900 lbs.), 57" wheels
    Horses Required to Pull: 6
    No. in North America: approx. 700
    Special Notes: Workhorse of Mexican War, but considered obsolete by Civil War

    Model 1841 6-pounder Gun
    This popular workhorse of the Mexican War era was regarded as superseded by the Union artillery, but was still heavily employed by a Confederate army that could not afford to pass up any opportunities.



    6 pdr. Wiard Rifle



    Type: Rifled gun
    Rarity: Rare
    Years of Manufacture: Between 1861 and 1862
    Tube Composition: Puddled wrought-iron (semi-steel)
    Bore Diameter: 2.6 inches
    Rifling Type: 8 grooves, left hand twist
    Standard Powder Charge: 0.75 lbs. Black Powder
    Projectiles: 6 lb. Hotchkiss bolt
    Effective Range (at 35): 7,000 yards
    Tube Length: 53 inches
    Tube Weight: 725 lbs.
    Carriage Type: Wiard Field Carriage
    No. in North America: about 60
    Invented By: Norman Wiard



    12 pdr. Howitzers

    Type: Howitzer
    Rarity: Uncommon to Rare
    Years of Manufacture: 1841 to 1863
    Tube Composition: Bronze
    Bore Diameter: 4.62 inches
    Standard Powder Charge: 1 lb.
    Projectiles: 8.9 lb. round balls
    Effective Range (at 5): 1072 yards
    Tube Length: 53 inches
    Tube Weight: 788 lbs.
    Carriage Type: No. 1 Field Carriage (900 lbs.), 57" wheels
    Horses Required to Pull: 6



    3-in. Ordnance Rifle

    Also Known As: 3-Inch Wrought Iron Rifle
    Type: Rifled gun
    Rarity: Common
    Years of Manufacture: 1861 to 1865
    Tube Composition: Wrought iron
    Bore Diameter: 3.0 inches
    Rifling Type: 7 rifle grooves
    Standard Powder Charge: 1 lb. Black Powder
    Projectiles: 10 lb. Bolts, 8 to 9 lbs. Hotchkiss or Schenkel shells
    Muzzle Velocity: 1,215 fps
    Effective Range (at 5): up to 1,850 yards
    Tube Length: 73 inches
    Tube Weight: 816 lbs.
    Total Weight (Gun & Carriage): 1,720 lbs.
    Carriage Type: No. 1 Field Carriage (900 lbs.), 57" wheels
    Horses Required to Pull: 6
    No. in North America: approx. 1000+
    Cost in 1861 Dollars: $330 (US)
    Cost in 1865 Dollars: $450 (US)
    Invented By: John Griffen in 1855
    US Casting Foundry: Phoenix Iron Company, Phoenixville PA
    CS Casting Foundry: Tredegar Iron Works, Richmond VA (CS castings are called: 3-inch Iron Field Rifles)
    Special Notes: Lightest and strongest rifled tube. Sometimes incorrectly referred to as a Rodman gun






    12 Pdr. Blakely

    Type: Rifled gun, 6 or 7 saw-tooth rifle grooves
    Rarity: Very Rare
    Years of Manufacture: 1860 - 1861
    Tube Composition: Wrought Iron or Steel
    Bore Diameter: 3.5 inches
    Standard Powder Charge: 1.5 lbs.
    Projectiles: 12 lb. bolt
    Tube Length: 59 inches
    Tube Weight: 800 lbs.
    Effective Range (at 5): 1,850 yards
    Invented By: Royal Artillery Captain Alexander Theopilis Blakely
    Casting Foundry: Fawcett, Preston & Co., Liverpool, England
    Special Notes: At least seven different varieties of Blakelys have been discovered in the many battlefields an museums across the country.





    Richmond Howitzers History


    George Wythe Randolph, the first captain of the Richmond Howitzers, was born in 1818 at Monticello, the home of his maternal grandfather, Thomas Jefferson. Randolph was appointed a midshipman at the age of thirteen, and served in the navy for six years. Afterwards he studied law at the University of Virginia, and in 1850 moved to Richmond to practice his profession. He conceived the idea of the "Howitzer Battery", which began organization on November 9, 1859, himself as captain and Gaston Otey as First Sergeant.





    George Wythe Randolph, the first captain of the Richmond Howitzers, was born in 1818 at Monticello, the home of his maternal grandfather, Thomas Jefferson. Randolph was appointed a midshipman at the age of thirteen, and served in the navy for six years. Afterwards he studied law at the University of Virginia, and in 1850 moved to Richmond to practice his profession. He conceived the idea of the "Howitzer Battery", which began organization on November 9, 1859, himself as captain and Gaston Otey as First Sergeant.

    The Richmond Howitzers grew into a battalion of three companies by May 1861. The original company, reorganized on May 8 with the election of Captain John C. Shields, was thereafter known as the 1st Company. In November 1861 Captain Shields was promoted to Lt. Colonel and transferred, to be replaced by Lt. Wm. Palmer. In March of 1862 Captain Palmer, who desired to go into army medical service, was replaced by 1st. Lt. Edward McCarthy.

    An elite unit, the Howitzers served with distinction. The 1st Company Richmond Howitzers, a four-gun battery, participated at First Manassas, the Peninsular Campaign, Seven Pines, the Seven Days' Battles, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and the retreat from Richmond to Appomattox.

    At Gettysburg, on July 2, 1863, its two rifled guns expended 200 rounds of ammunition in less than two hours at Devil's Den, and the next day, one piece alone expended 300 rounds in support of Pickett's Charge. The battery saw its commander, Edward S. McCarthy, killed at Cold Harbor; felled instantly by a sharpshooter’s minie ball.

    The book: "Four Years Under Marse Robert," by Major Robert Stiles of Cabell's Batallion offers these observations of the Richmond Howitzers:




    "The composition of the three companies was very similar; that is, all of them were made up largely of young business men and clerks of the highest grade and best character from the city of Richmond, but included also a number of country boys, for the most part of excellent families, with a very considerable infusion of college-bred men, for it was strikingly true that in 1861 the flower of our educated youth gravitated toward the artillery. The outcome was something quite unparalleled, so far as I know. It is safe to say that no less than one hundred men were commissioned from the corps during the war, and these of every rank from a Secretary of War down to a second lieutenant."


    "Few things have ever impressed me as did the intellectual and moral character of the men who composed the circle I entered the day our guide led my brother and myself to the Howitzer Camp. I had lived for years at the North, had graduated recently at Yale, and had but just entered upon the study of law in the city of New York, when the war began... To my surprise and delight, around the camp fires of the First Company, Richmond Howitzers, I found throbbing an intellectual life as high and brilliant and intense as any I had ever known."





    Time Line:
    November 9, 1859 - George Wythe Randolph founds the Richmond Howitzers, a light artillery unit, and is elected captain. The Howitzers march to Charles Town to help guard John Brown during his trial and subsequent execution.

    1860 - The Richmond Howitzers become Company H, 1st Virginia Volunteer Regiment.

    May 3–9, 1861 - Three companies organize as the Richmond Howitzer Battalion and are mustered into Confederate service.

    September 13, 1861 - The 2nd and 3rd companies, Richmond Howitzers, become a part of the 1st Virginia Artillery Regiment.

    April 9, 1865 - The 1st Company, Richmond Howitzers, disbands near Red Oak Church, and the 2nd and 3rd companies surrender with the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House.

    April 10, 1871 - The Richmond Howitzers reorganize as a light artillery company of the Virginia militia.

    1917–1918 - The Richmond Howitzers serve as Company A, 111th Field Artillery Regiment, during World War I.

    February 3, 1941 - The Richmond Howitzers enter federal service as a part of the 111th Field Artillery Regiment in the 29th Infantry Division.

    1942–1945 - The Richmond Howitzers serve as Battery A, 111th Field Artillery Regiment, during World War II.

    1972 - The Richmond Howitzers become Battery A, 111th Field Artillery Regiment, in the Virginia National Guard.






    Monument of the Richmond Howitzers





    The battery was commanded at the Battle of Gettysburg by Captain Edward S. McCarthy, who was wounded on July 3. It brought two smoothbore 12-pounder Napoleons and two 3″ Ordnance Rifles to the field.

    On July 2 the battery took a position north of the Snyder farm where the marker is today. The rifles opened fire around 4:00 p.m. to support Longstreet’s attack, with the shorter ranged Napoleons in reserve. The rifles fired 200 rounds at the Devils Den. The battery received the heaviest artillery fire they had experienced, losing seven men wounded and thirteen horses killed.

    On July 3 the battery was placed well in advance of the skirmish line and drove back a Federal advance with twenty rounds. It then repositioned to the center of the Confederate line on Seminary Ridge for the grand barrage preceding Pickett’s Charge. The barrage opened around 1:30, firing 300 rounds. A wheel was shot off one of the rifles and a caisson was abandoned when its team was killed. Two men were killed and two wounded and ten horses were lost. During the two days of the fighting the rifles fired about 600 rounds and the Napoleons 264.



    Baltimore Artillery History

    The battery was organized in Richmond in the Fall of 1861 under the command of Captain J.B. Brockenborough (and is often refered to in Confederate histories as Brockenborough's Artillery), a young Virginia recently graduated from the Virginia Military Institute. The battery was attached to General Arnold Elzey's Brigade (which included the 1st Maryland Infantry) of Ewell's Division, at Centerville. The battery remained here until March of 1862, when General Johnson pulled back from Manassas. Shortly afterwards General Ewell was directed to march west to the Shenandoah and join General Jackson at Swift Run Gap.





    Antietam: On the 15th Jackson placed the battery among the guns on Loudoun Heights, from where it participated in the reduction of Harper's Ferry. Immediately after the surrender of the garriosn, the battery force marched back across the Potomac and north to Sharpsburg. They arrived along the Antietam on the evening of the 16th and were aligned along several hills on Lee's left flank to protect both his flank and the fords to the army's rear.

    On the morning of the 17th the artillery on Lee's left engaged Federal batteries for nearly two hours. Federal infantry threatened the position near mid-morning but was met by Jackson's infantry. The infantry battle soon shifted further south toward the Dunkard Church and again the artillery found itself with little suppport. Federal infantry massed infront of the artillery and soon advance. Brockenborough, temporarily in command of his battery and five others, 24 guns in all, orders his men "Do not pull a lanyard until you get the command." He waited until the Federal line was nearly on top of his guns, then all 24 opened with double canister. Three times the Federals charged, and three times they were repulsed. W.W. Goldsborough writes "The ground was literally covered - nay; piled - with the slain and amimed of the enemy."




    The battery was organized in Richmond in the Fall of 1861 under the command of Captain J.B. Brockenborough (and is often refered to in Confederate histories as Brockenborough's Artillery), a young Virginia recently graduated from the Virginia Military Institute. The battery was attached to General Arnold Elzey's Brigade (which included the 1st Maryland Infantry) of Ewell's Division, at Centerville. The battery remained here until March of 1862, when General Johnson pulled back from Manassas. Shortly afterwards General Ewell was directed to march west to the Shenandoah and join General Jackson at Swift Run Gap.

    The night Ewell's command marched into Jackson's camp, Old Mad Jack departed, without leaving word of where he was going. He returned several days later after his victory at McDowell, then advanced with both commands to Front Royal, where the 1st Maryland Infantry C.S.A. and U.S.A. faced off with one another. The Baltimore Light "took a prominent part "in the fight.

    During Jackson's retreat up the Valley, the Baltimore Light was detailed to support Turner Ashby and Maryland Steuart's cavalry as they protected the rear of Jackson's column. The battery was hotly engaged on a daily basis. At Fishers Hill a section of the battery was surrounded and cut off from the cavalry, but managed to drive right through the enemy line to safety.

    The battery supported Ashby and the 1st Maryland Infantry in their heroic engagement with the Pennsylvania Bucktails at Harrisonburg. Ashby was killed in the action. At the Battle of Cross Keys on June 8th the battery supported the 1st Maryland on the far left of Ewell's line. This was an exposed portion of the line and fell under constant fire. The battery so aquited itself that the following day, after his brigade captured two Napoleons at Port Republic, General Dick Taylor presented them to the Baltimore Light.

    With Richmond threatened, Jackson marched from the Shenandoah to Gaines Mills in seven days. On June 26th the 1st Maryland, at the head of Jackson's column engaged Federal troops some ten miles from Gaines Mill. The Baltimore Light was brought to the front of the column and promptly drove the Federal off. The following afternoon the battery became hotly engaged in an open field against superior Federal artillery. Operating directly under the attention of General Jackson, the battery pressed forward to fight at close range with the enemy artillery. Federal artillery generally had the advantage over the antiquated Blakely's and Napoleons the Confederates used. The battery engaged Federal artillery again on the 29th at Dispatch Station, and July 1st at Malvern Hill.

    After the defense of Richmond, the Baltimore Light and 1st Maryland Infantry, almost always together, moved to Charlottesville, where they rested for a month. Sadly the 1st Maryland was then moved to Gordonsville and disbanded, their terms of enlistment up; and the Baltimore Light joined Jackson on the Rappahanock, assigned to General Starke's Louisiana Brigade.

    On August 21st the battery was heavily engaged with company M., United States Regulars. The following day the battery crossed the river, but the expedition soon encountered a large Federal force and was compelled to recross the river. The battery found itself in an intense struggle for survival, four of it's members did not survive.

    Between the 24th and 26th, the battery covered 50 miles in 48 hours with nothing to eat except green corn harvested on the march. On the 26th they arrived at Manassas Junction, where Jackson allowed his men to engage in an orgy of eating the captured stores there. He then moved to Centerville, and then to Manassas. The battery supported General Jackson during the fighting on the 29th, and on the 30th was a part of Genral Lee's battalion artillery, and was involved in heavy fighting, and was instrumental in repelling the afternoon assaults on Jackson's defenses.

    The battery moved with Jackson across the Potomac and spent three days in Frederick where according to their biographer their wants and needs were met by the local citizens. The battery then recrossed the Potomac with Jackson and entered Martinsburg on September 12th.

    Antietam: On the 15th Jackson placed the battery among the guns on Loudoun Heights, from where it participated in the reduction of Harper's Ferry. Immediately after the surrender of the garriosn, the battery force marched back across the Potomac and north to Sharpsburg. They arrived along the Antietam on the evening of the 16th and were aligned along several hills on Lee's left flank to protect both his flank and the fords to the army's rear.

    On the morning of the 17th the artillery on Lee's left engaged Federal batteries for nearly two hours. Federal infantry threatened the position near mid-morning but was met by Jackson's infantry. The infantry battle soon shifted further south toward the Dunkard Church and again the artillery found itself with little suppport. Federal infantry massed infront of the artillery and soon advance. Brockenborough, temporarily in command of his battery and five others, 24 guns in all, orders his men "Do not pull a lanyard until you get the command." He waited until the Federal line was nearly on top of his guns, then all 24 opened with double canister. Three times the Federals charged, and three times they were repulsed. W.W. Goldsborough writes "The ground was literally covered - nay; piled - with the slain and amimed of the enemy."

    After Antietam the Baltimore Light was attached to the "Maryland Line" and went into winter quarters near Newmarket, Virginia.


    On June 13th the Maryland Line was directed to move toward Winchester where they were to join Early's Division, which was moving north toward Maryland. At Kernstown the Line encountered part of General Milroy's command. The Maryland Line formed line of battle and the Baltimore Light began dueling with the Federal artillery, holding the enemy until Early arrived. The following day the battery was palced on a commanding hill near Winchester and commenced to bombard one of the Federal positions, Star Fort. General Gordon praised the battery's performace, and the following day convinced Early to allow the battery to have first choice from the captured Federal artillery to replace it's own guns.

    At Winchester the battery was assigned to General Jenkins cavalry and was in the van as Early marched into Pennsylvania. With Jenkins the battery participated in several minor skirmishes, the capture of Carlisle, and the bombardment of Harrisburg. At Gettysburg the battery was palced on Lee's far left (ironicly all Maryland units Confederate and Federal, who fought at Gettysburg, eventually ended up on or near Culp's Hill. Both cavalry contingents fought to the east of Culp's Hill) on Brenner Hill under Major Latimer's command. As noted in the 1st Maryland Artillery's history, Brenner's Hill was dominated by Federal artillery on Cemetery Ridge and suffered greatly in the duel that ensued on the second day.

    During Lee's retreat the infantry column to which the Baltimore Light was attached was unable to cross Mount Zion due to the presence of a Federal battery quite familiar to the Baltimore Light, Battery M., U.S. Regulars. The battery ran it's guns up the slope to within point blank range and after a long duel drove the Federals off. Shortly after, the battery was engaged in the cavalry bttle in Hagerstown.

    Back in Virginia the battery moved about several times before it was ordered to Culpepper Court House on September 10th. During the battle the battery became engaged with a full contingent of Federal artillery. The fire was so hot that infantry support for the battery soon withdrew, leaving the battery exposed. It continued to fight valiantly until one of it's guns and crew were captured. The following day the battery took it's revenge on a Union cavalry squadron performing drills and totally oblivious to the battery's presence.

    In October the battery was assigned to General Young's cavalry brigade and accompanied him on a raid beyond the Rapidan. The battery was hotly engaged at close range with enemy cavalry and artillery on the 10th at James City and 12th at Brandy Station. After the raid it was sent to Hanover Junction where it joined once again the newly formed "Maryland Line."

    The battery was in position on Lee's left when on May 10, 1864, General JEB Stuart, moving to intercept Sheridan's cavalry column marching on Richmond, requested that the Maryland Line detach the batttery temporarily to his command. The battery moved to Yellow Tavern on the 11th was hotly engaged. It retired about a half a mile, but was soon order forward to a position to the left of the Brook turnpike. Sheridan brought up three batteries to battle the Baltimore Light, and for several hours they dueled one another at a range of 800 yards. Federal cavalry charged the postion several times and was greeted each time by grape and canister. Finally the Marylanders could withstand no more. According to Goldsborough, Stuart took his standard in his hands and ordered "Charge Virginians, and save those brave Marylanders!" It was his last command as dismounted Michigan trooper stepped from the fog and smoke of battle and shot him.

    Yellow Tavern decimated the battery, two guns were barely saved, many of the men and horses were dead, wounded or captured. The battery limped back to Hanover Junction. It was then moved to Cold Harbor, but moved with Second Corps into the Valley. Attached to General Bradley Johnson's 1st Maryland Cavalry, the battery particpated in Johnson's advance on Fredricksburg and the battle on Catoctin Mountain that preceded it. It then accompanied Johnson on his raid through Maryland and participated in the reduction and burning of Chambersburg on July 30th.

    After Chambersburg, the Confedrate column retired to Moorefield, West Virginia, where they were surprised by Federal cavalry. The battery lost thirteen men, killed and wounded before they could even load their guns. The Baltimore all but ceased to exist. The survivors moved to Newmarket, where the battery was refitted with guns and horses, and Marylanders who had served three years at Fort Sumter, joined the battery.

    Rejuvinated, the battery took part in Early's ill fated Valley Campaign, fighting at Waynesboro, Fisher's Hill and Woodstock; where four guns and 23 men were captured. The remnants of the command moved to Fishersville where they hoped to refit during the winter, but were ordered to Lynchburg and then to Petersburg, where they fought as infantry.

    The Baltimore Light continued as infantry west with Lee's army as it moved to link up with Johnston in North Carolina. What was left of the command surrendered at Appomattox Court House.










    Battalion HQ
    Dutch (Administrative/ coordination)
    Captain George (Field commander)
    1st Lt. Danish Raven (Assistent field commander)


    Last edited by Dutchconfederate; 05-16-2019 at 10:35 AM.

  2. #2

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    Lance Rawlings's Avatar
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    Welcome to the CSA! Best of luck!
    To the Colors!

    Captain Lance Rawlings
    Company K, 38th North Carolina, Pender's Brigade, A.P. Hill's Division, Jackson's Corps, Army of Northern Virginia
    http://www.warofrightsforum.com/show...lina-Boys-quot


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    Thank you Captain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dutchconfederate View Post
    Thank you Captain.
    You're welcome! Now go and blow the yanks minds.
    To the Colors!

    Captain Lance Rawlings
    Company K, 38th North Carolina, Pender's Brigade, A.P. Hill's Division, Jackson's Corps, Army of Northern Virginia
    http://www.warofrightsforum.com/show...lina-Boys-quot


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    Welcome to the CSA! For Southern rights!

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    Welcome to the Confederacy!
    Texas Poppin B
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  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by James Kipler View Post
    Welcome to the CSA! For Southern rights!
    Quote Originally Posted by Saris View Post
    Welcome to the Confederacy!
    Thank you both! Glad to be with such friendly people.

  8. #8

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    Looking for at least 8 more members :-) Must be some guys out there who like the Artillery!
    Edited:



    I have 10 members looking for more to join! This battery has some special history to it! I would love to have folk from Richmond joining!
    Last edited by Dutchconfederate; 12-27-2016 at 11:56 AM. Reason: updated number of members

  9. #9

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    For those who are interested but don't want to sit around waiting. We don't have to, if you have acces we can drill as infantry or fall in with one of the other fine infantry companies around.
    https://www.warofrightsforum.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=3262&dateline=1552563  685
    I-Corp 2nd Brigade

  10. #10

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    Welcome to the Confederacy!
    Colonel - James Dixon,
    Commander of Eagle Brigade,
    Second Corps Union Army


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