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Thread: Original Civil War Weaponry

  1. #1

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    Original Civil War Weaponry

    If you have any original (original meaning non-reproduction) Civil War weaponry, post a picture(s) of it here with as much history or general information as you know about it.
    The chances are by the time you have finished typing a long response to my post, I have changed half of the original post.

  2. #2
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    PRESENTATION SWORD OF CIVIL WAR MEDAL OF HONOR WINNER CAPTAIN CHARLES McANALLY - 69th P.V.I.

    This "W. Clauberg" staff officer's sword with magnificent associated Pennsylvania blade is of high grade quality for this manufacturer. Blade is gold and navy blue etched with military motifs, maker's mark, and Pennsylvania State Seal. Grip is made of sheet silver, with a fluted design. Hilt and scabbard mounts are extra-rich, having more raised relief design than normally seen. Each scabbard mount has a patriotic motif; Top Mount - Lady Liberty, Middle Mount - Military Accouterments, and Drag- Fraternal Emblems. The Presentation plaque has been tested and confirmed as 18K Solid Gold. Between the top mounts reads "Presented to Lieut. Charles McAnally, Co. D 69th P.V. by Your Friends in Philadelphia, October 20, 1862." Of even more importance is the historical history of Captain McAnally in the Battles of Gettysburg and Spotsylvania by his incredible valor and leadership under enemy fire. This impression was so recognized by the Congress of the United States by awarding him the Medal of Honor on August 7, 1897 for his valiant deeds. Born on May 12, 1836, in Glenviggen, Ireland, Charles McAnally entered military service as a 1st Sgt. of the 69th Pennsylvania regiment, Co. D on August 19, 1861. He served throughout the Civil War and rose to the rank of Captain.

    Charles McAnally was engaged in many battles and skirmishes. He was not the luckiest soldier around and seems to have collected more than his fair share of wounds. However he was certainly a survivor. In 1861 even before the war really got started, he was wounded in an accident in the Armory in Walnut Street Philadelphia. McAnally had enlisted into the 69th at Philadelphia on Aug. 19th, 1861 age 24. He was assigned to Co.D of the Regiment. Quick promotion would follow and by Sept. 1st, 1861 he was 1st Sergeant. On Sept 16th of the same year, he was promoted to 2nd Lieut and later to 1st Lieut on May 1st, 1863. On Sept 24th, 1861 while on a night patrol at Munson Hill Va., he was hit with a rifle shot below the right knee. Capt. McAnally was also wounded in the thigh at Yorktown, VA on May 7, 1862. In another incident he was hit by "friendly fire" in late Sept. 1862. McAnally was then wounded at the Battle of Antietam, shot in the right thigh. This necessitated him being hospitalized in Philadelphia in October 1862 where while in the hospital, his friends thought fit to present him with this beautiful M1850 Staff and Field Presentation sword. This was the first sword he was presented during the Civil War by his friends and peers in Philadelphia.

    After recovering he returned to active service. He would soon be back in the thick of action and was wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg in July 3rd 1863, receiving a saber wound to the head at "The Angle" Pickett's Charge. During the fighting at the "Angle", Capt. Charles McAnally and several of his men captured Confederate General James Kemper. Kemper, who was shot in the groin surrendered his sword and personal belongings to Capt. McAnally and gave him his address to send them to his wife. When being carted off in a rolled up blanket, a volley of shots was fired into McAnally's men by the 1st Virginia and subsequent rescue of General Kemper. Capt. McAnally again survived this incident but retained possession of General Kemper's sword and belongings.

    McAnally was shot below the knee at the Battle of Cold Harbor on June 3rd, 1864. Surgeons wanted to remove his leg. However he persuaded them not to amputate. McAnally was promoted to Capt. of Co. G of the 69th Regt on Oct. 4th, 1864. Capt. McAnally eventually won his Medal of Honor at the Battle of Spotsylvania but not before being wounded twice, in his left shoulder and receiving buckshot to his face.

    Charles McAnally was not a man to be meddled with. He was obviously held in great esteem by his fellow soldiers as they presented him with a second sword at the end of the War in 1865. Capt. Charles McAnally mustered out of service on July 1st, 1865 near Washington DC.

    From the early date of this presentation (1862), Captain McAnally would have had this sword during the Battles of Gettysburg and Spotsylvania and throughout the War where his heroic actions led to the awarding of the Medal of Honor.

    Sword Of Capt. Of Co. D 69th PVI































    Hint hint Trusty this sword was actually worn in combat sooo maybe we will see it in game after all he was a Medal of Honor recipient so

  3. #3
    WoR-Dev TrustyJam's Avatar
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    Here's my stuff.

    M1840 NCO sword dated 1863.

    M1840_1.jpgM1840_2.jpgM1840_3.jpg

    M1859 New Model Sharps rifle.

    M1859 Sharps rifle_1.jpg

    Serial number makes it part of the first 1000 purchased by the US in 1860. It went to Washington naval yard.

    M1851 Colt Navy

    M1851_Navy_1.jpgM1851_Navy_2.jpg

    Produced in 1858.

    I also have a P53 Enfield.

    All items are being used by our animator on a pretty regular basis.

    - Trusty

  4. #4

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    I do not know very much about this sword as I recently found it in storage and hope that someone here on the forums could help me with identifying it. Here is what I know/speculate:
    -I know it is an original civil war sword.
    -Possibly a musicians sword as it matches the images of one I researched. Although, it may very well be an NCO's sword as research also found that models are incredibly similar that are verified NCO's sword.
    -Not an officers sword.
    - The 'C.Roby' stamping does not yield too much information as they also made cavalry swords (of which I have another original made).
    -The sheath was very poorly preserved by previous owners and is in tatters; any markings are illegible.

    I am fairly sure it is an NCO's sword, but, I would like to know what F.S.S. stands for.
    unnamed-2.jpg
    unnamed-1.jpg
    unnamed-3.jpg
    unnamed.jpg
    Last edited by McMuffin; 02-27-2018 at 02:13 AM.
    The chances are by the time you have finished typing a long response to my post, I have changed half of the original post.

  5. #5

    CSA Major

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    Quote Originally Posted by TrustyJam View Post
    Here's my stuff.

    M1840 NCO sword dated 1863.

    M1840_1.jpgM1840_2.jpgM1840_3.jpg

    M1859 New Model Sharps rifle.

    M1859 Sharps rifle_1.jpg

    Serial number makes it part of the first 1000 purchased by the US in 1860. It went to Washington naval yard.

    M1851 Colt Navy

    M1851_Navy_1.jpgM1851_Navy_2.jpg

    Produced in 1858.

    I also have a P53 Enfield.

    All items are being used by our animator on a pretty regular basis.

    - Trusty
    Did you get the sword and sharps rifle photographed professionally?
    The chances are by the time you have finished typing a long response to my post, I have changed half of the original post.

  6. #6

    USA 2nd Lieutenant

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    Quote Originally Posted by McMuffin View Post

    I am fairly sure it is an NCO's sword, but, I would like to know what F.S.S. stands for.
    unnamed-2.jpg
    unnamed-1.jpg
    unnamed-3.jpg
    unnamed.jpg
    I just clicked my way through the net and found that FSS might well stand for a certain "Francis Strong", an inspector for Roby, which would make this sword very well an NCO`s sword.

    Regards
    Last edited by Jagdmann; 02-27-2018 at 09:24 PM.

  7. #7

    USA 1st Lieutenant

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    Quote Originally Posted by McMuffin View Post

    I am fairly sure it is an NCO's sword, but, I would like to know what F.S.S. stands for.

    Fuck's sake, Southerners!!



    Best,
    Dman979

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by McMuffin View Post
    I do not know very much about this sword as I recently found it in storage and hope that someone here on the forums could help me with identifying it. Here is what I know/speculate:
    -I know it is an original civil war sword.
    -Possibly a musicians sword as it matches the images of one I researched. Although, it may very well be an NCO's sword as research also found that models are incredibly similar that are verified NCO's sword.
    -Not an officers sword.
    - The 'C.Roby' stamping does not yield too much information as they also made cavalry swords (of which I have another original made).
    -The sheath was very poorly preserved by previous owners and is in tatters; any markings are illegible.

    I am fairly sure it is an NCO's sword, but, I would like to know what F.S.S. stands for.
    unnamed-2.jpg
    unnamed-1.jpg
    unnamed-3.jpg
    unnamed.jpg
    What's the length? There are regulations for sword length of NCO vs. Musician's.

    My first glance I saw Musician's but there were always variants.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by SwingKid148 View Post
    What's the length? There are regulations for sword length of NCO vs. Musician's.

    My first glance I saw Musician's but there were always variants.
    The blade length is 28.15 inches (71.5cm).
    The chances are by the time you have finished typing a long response to my post, I have changed half of the original post.

  10. #10

    USA Captain

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    Quote Originally Posted by McMuffin View Post
    The blade length is 28.15 inches (71.5cm).
    I can't seem to find the regulations page but this website measures an original musician's sword at 28": http://howardlanham.tripod.com/link73.htm

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