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Thread: Civil War Regiments - Summary, Stats and Command Rosters

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    Civil War Regiments - Summary, Stats and Command Rosters

    Hello all, right now I'm compiling a list of regiments from the Civil War - particularly the regiments that are being used by companies in WoR - and providing a brief summary, stats, and command rosters for these regiments. If anyone's interested in throwing in anything at all, please feel free to do so. I'll start with my own company's regiment: the 8th Virginia Infantry.


    8th Virginia Infantry Regiment
    "The Bloody Eighth"



    Active: May, 1861 -- April, 1865
    Assignments:
    Cocke's Brigade: Philip St. George Cocke: June - August, 1861
    Evans's Brigade: Nathan G. "Shanks" Evans: September - December, 1861
    Pickett's Brigade: George E. Pickett: January - November, 1862
    Garnett's Brigade: Richard B. Garnett: December, 1862 - July, 1863
    Hunton's Brigade: Eppa Hunton: August, 1863 - April, 1865

    Original Command / Company Roster:

    Eppa Hunton: Colonel
    Charles B. Tebbs: Lieutenant Colonel
    Norborne Berkeley: Major
    John M. Orr: Quartermaster
    Dr. Richard H. Edwards: Surgeon
    Charles F. Linthicum: Chaplain

    Company A: Hillsboro Border Guards -- Loudoun County. Accepted into state service April 19, 1861. Captain N.R. Heaton
    Company B: Piedmont Rifles -- Fauquier County. Enlisted May 17, 1861, at Rectortown, Virginia. Captain Richard H. Carter
    Company C: Evergreen Guards -- Prince William County. Enlisted May 8, 1861, at Haymarket, Virginia. Captain Edmund Berkeley
    Company D: Champe Rifles -- Loudoun County. Enlisted May 13, 1861, at Aldie, Virginia. Captain William N. Berkeley
    Company E: Hampton’s Company -- Loudoun County. Enlisted May 29, 1861, at Philomont, Virginia. Captain Mandley Hampton.
    Company F: Blue Mountain Boys -- Loudoun County. Enlisted June 19, 1861, at Bloomfield, Virginia. Captain Alex Grayson.
    Company G: Thrift’s Company -- Fairfax County. Enlisted June 22, 1861, at Dranesville, Virginia. Mustered into service July 16, 1861. Captain James Thrift.
    Company H: Potomac Grays -- Loudoun County. Enlisted July 13, 1861, at Leesburg, Virginia. Captain J. Morris Wampler
    Company I: Simpson’s Company -- Loudoun County. Enlisted July 13, 1861, at Mt. Gilead-North Fork, Virginia. Captain James Simpson
    Company K: Scott’s Company -- Fauquier County. Enlisted July 30, 1861, at Warrenton, Virginia. Captain Robert T. Scott


    List of Engagements:
    First Manassas (First Bull Run): Manassas Campaign: July 21, 1861
    Leesburg (Ball's Bluff): McClellan's Operations in Northern Virginia: October 21, 1861
    Williamsburg (Fort Magruder): Peninsula Campaign: May 5, 1862
    Seven Pines (Fair Oaks): Peninsula Campaign: May 31 - June 1, 1862
    Seven Days Battles: Peninsula Campaign: June 25 - July 1, 1862
    Gaines's Mill (Chickahominy River) (Seven Days Battles): Peninsula Campaign: June 27, 1862
    Frazier's Farm (Glendale) (Seven Days Battles): Peninsula Campaign: June 30, 1862
    Malvern Hill (Poindexter's Farm) (Seven Days Battles): Peninsula Campaign: July 1, 1862
    Second Manassas (Second Bull Run): Northern Virginia Campaign: August 28-30, 1862
    Chantilly (Ox Hill): Northern Virginia Campaign: September 1, 1862
    Boonsboro Gap (South Mountain): Maryland Campaign: September 14, 1862
    Sharpsburg (Antietam): Maryland Campaign: September 17, 1862
    Fredericksburg: Fredericksburg Campaign: December 11-15, 1862
    Siege of Suffolk: Longstreet's Tidewater Operations: April 11 - May 3, 1863
    Gettysburg: Gettysburg Campaign: July 1-3, 1863
    Drewry's Bluff (Proctor's Creek): Bermuda Hundred Campaign: May 12-16, 1864
    Cold Harbor: Overland Campaign: May 31 - June 12, 1864
    Howlett's Farm: Richmond-Petersburg Campaign: August 24, 1864
    Chaffin's Farm (Laurel Hill): Richmond-Petersburg Campaign: September 29-30, 1864
    Hatcher's Run (White Oak Road): Appomattox Campaign: March 31, 1865
    Five Forks: Appomattox Campaign: April 1, 1865
    Sayler's Creek: Appomattox Campaign: April 6, 1865
    Appomattox Station: April 8, 1865
    Appomattox Court House: Appomattox Campaign: April 9, 1865

    Summary:
    The 8th Virginia Infantry Regiment was a Confederate infantry regiment raised by Colonel Eppa Hunton in Leesburg, Virginia, on May 8, 1861. The unit comprised six companies from Loudoun County, two companies from Fauquier County, one company from Fairfax County, and one company from Prince William County. The 8th Virginia participated in every major battle on the Eastern Theater with Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Notable actions of the 8th Virginia include fighting at Henry Hill during First Manassas, driving off a Federal attack on Leesburg at Ball's Bluff, participating in the Army of Northern Virginia's counterattack at Chinn Ridge during Second Manassas, fighting up the slopes of South Mountain, engaging Federal troops just beyond Burnside's Bridge at Antietam, and participating in Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg. During the doomed Pickett's Charge on the Third Day, the 8th Virginia sustained 90% casualties. Of the 205 soldiers lined up for the charge, only 40 men returned, with most of the soldiers and officers being killed or captured in the charge. After the Battle of Gettysburg, the 8th Virginia was significantly downsized, with many of its ranks being filled by Southern conscripts. For the remainder of the war, the 8th Virginia fought against Ulysses S. Grant's Union forces in Virginia, and finally surrendered at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. By the of Appomattox Court House, only Dr. Richard Edwards, the regiment's surgeon, and 11 privates had survived to be paroled 3 days after Lee's surrender.


    The Irish 69th New York State Militia is charged by the 8th Virginia at Henry Hill during 1st Manassas, July 21, 1861
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    Last edited by JDwoody; 10-17-2018 at 05:52 AM.

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    1st Texas Infantry

    1st Texas Infantry Regiment
    "The Ragged Old First"

    1st Texas.jpg

    Active: August, 1861 -- April, 1865
    Assignments:
    Texas Brigade (Hood's Brigade): John B. Hood: October, 1861 - April, 1865

    Original Command / Company Roster:

    Louis T. Wigfall: Colonel
    Hugh McLeod: Lieutenant Colonel
    Dale Matt: Major

    Company A: Marion Rifles -- Marion County. Mustered into service at New Orleans, Louisiana,s on May 16, 1861, "for one year's service." Captain Harvey H. Black
    Company B: Livingston Guards -- Livingston County. Mustered into service at New Orleans, Louisiana, on May 16, 1861, "for one year's service." Captain D.D. Moore
    Company C: Palmer Guards -- Harris County. Mustered into service at New Orleans, Louisiana, on May 19, 1861, "for one year's service." Captain A.G. Dickinson
    Company D: Star Rifles -- Marion County. Mustered into service at New Orleans, Louisiana, on June 6, 1861, "for one year's service." Captain (Dr.) Albert G. Clopton
    Company E: Marshall Guards -- Harrison County. Mustered into service at New Orleans, Louisiana, on June 6, 1861, "for one year's service." Captain Frederick S. Bass
    Company F: Woodville Rifles -- Tyler County. Mustered into service at New Orleans, Louisiana, on May 28, 1861, "for one year's service." Captain Philip A. Work
    Company G: Reagan Guards -- Anderson County. Mustered into service at Palestine, Texas, on June 23, 1861, "for the war." Captain John R. Woodward
    Company H: Texas Guards -- Anderson County. Mustered into service at New Orleans, Louisiana, on June 24, 1861, "for the war." Captain Alex T. Rainey
    Company I: Crockett's Southrons -- Houston County. Mustered into service at New Orleans, Louisiana, on June 24, 1861, "for the war." Captain Edward Currie
    Company K: Texas Invincibles -- San Augustine County. Mustered into service at Griffin's Spring near Richmond, Virginia, on October 11, 1861, "for the war." Captain Benjamin F. Benton
    Company L: Lone Star Rifles -- Galveston County. Mustered into service near Manassas, Virginia, on August 30, 1861, "for the war." Captain Alfred C. McKeen
    Company M: Sumter Light Infantry -- Trinity County. Mustered into service at Sumter, Texas, on May 5, 1862, "for the war." Captain Howard Ballenger

    List of Engagements:
    Eltham's Landing (Barhamsville): Peninsula Campaign: May 7, 1862
    Seven Pines (Fair Oaks): May 31 - June 1, 1862
    Seven Days Battles: Peninsula Campaign: June 25 - July 1, 1862
    Gaines's Mill (Chickahominy River) (Seven Days' Battles): Peninsula Campaign: June 27, 1862
    Malvern Hill (Poindexter's Farm) (Seven Days' Battles): Peninsula Campaign: July 1, 1862
    First Rappahannock Station (Freeman's Ford): Northern Virginia Campaign: August 22, 1862
    Second Manassas (Second Bull Run): Northern Virginia Campaign: August 28-30, 1862
    Boonsboro Gap (South Mountain): Maryland Campaign: September 14, 1862
    Sharpsburg (Antietam): Maryland Campaign: September 17, 1862
    Fredericksburg: Fredericksburg Campaign: December 11-15, 1862
    Siege of Suffolk: Longstreet's Tidewater Operations: April 11 - May 4, 1863
    Gettysburg: Gettysburg Campaign: July 1-3, 1863
    Chickamauga: Chickamauga Campaign: September 19-20, 1863
    Wauhatchie: Reopening the Tennessee River Campaign: October 28-29, 1863
    Missionary Ridge: Chattanooga Campaign: November 25, 1863
    Fort Sanders: Knoxville Campaign: November 29, 1863
    The Wilderness: Overland Campaign: May 5-7, 1864
    Spotsylvania Court House: Overland Campaign: May 8-21, 1864
    North Anna: Overland Campaign: May 23-26, 1864
    Cold Harbor: Overland Campaign: May 31 - June 12, 1864
    Siege of Petersburg: Richmond-Petersburg Campaign: June 12, 1864 - March 25, 1865
    Chaffin's Farm (Laurel Hill): Richmond-Petersburg Campaign: September 29-30, 1864
    Appomattox Court House: Appomattox Campaign: April 9, 1865

    Summary:
    The 1st Texas Infantry Regiment, nicknamed the "Ragged Old First," was an infantry regiment raised in Texas for service in the Confederate States Army. It fought mostly with Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Part of John Bell Hood's Texas Brigade, the 1st Texas Infantry participated in a large majority of the major battles in both the middle / latter part of the Eastern Theater, and the latter part of the Western Theater. Notable actions of the 1st Texas include repulsing a Union cavalry attack and capturing several gun batteries at Gaines' Mill during the Seven Days Battles, spearheading Longstreet's assault on Pope's left flank at Second Manassas, fighting in brutal combat at Miller's Cornfield during the Battle of Sharpsburg, and assaulting the Devil's Den and Little Round Top on the Second Day of the Battle of Gettysburg. These men of the 1st Texas, as part of the overall Texas Brigade, were considered elite shock troops in Lee's Army of Northern Virginia.


    Soldiers of the 1st Texas Infantry charge through Miller's Cornfield at Antietam, September 17, 1862
    Last edited by JDwoody; 10-17-2018 at 05:54 AM.

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    1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    1st minnesota flag.jpg

    Active: April 29, 1861 -- April 28, 1864
    Assignments:
    Various Brigades of the Army of the Potomac: Various Commanders: 1861 - 1863

    Original Command / Company Roster:

    Willis A. Gorman: Colonel
    Stephen Miller: Lieutenant Colonel
    William H. Dike: Major
    George H. Woods: Quartermaster
    Dr. J.H. Stewart: Surgeon
    Reverend Edward Neill: Chaplain

    Company A: Pioneer Guards -- Organized in St. Paul, Minnesota, on April 29, 1861. Captain Alexander Wilkin
    Company B: Stillwater Guards -- Organized in Stillwater, Minnesota, on April 29, 1861. Captain Carlisle Bromley
    Company C: St. Paul Volunteers -- Organized in St. Paul, Minnesota, on April 29, 1861. Captain William Acker
    Company D: Lincoln Guards -- Organized in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on April 29, 1861. Captain Henry Putnam
    Company E: St. Anthony Zouaves -- Organized in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on April 29, 1861. Captain George Morgan
    Company F: Goodhue Volunteers -- Organized in Red Wing, Minnesota, on April 30, 1861. Captain William J. Colvill
    Company G: Faribault Volunteers -- Organized in Faribault, Minnesota, on April 30, 1861. Captain William Dike
    Company H: Dakota Volunteers -- Organized in Hastings, Minnesota, on April 30, 1861. Captain Charles Adams
    Company I: Wabasha Volunteers -- Organized in Wabasha, Minnesota, on April 30, 1861. Captain John Pell
    Company K: Winona Volunteers -- Organized in Winona, Minnesota, on May 1, 1861. Captain Henry Lester

    List of Engagements:
    First Bull Run (First Manassas): Manassas Campaign: July 21, 1861
    Ball's Bluff (Leesburg): McClellan's Operations in Northern Virginia: October 21, 1861
    Seven Pines (Fair Oaks): Peninsula Campaign: May 31 - June 1, 1862
    Seven Days Battles: Peninsula Campaign: June 25 - July 1, 1862
    Savage's Station (Seven Days Battles): Peninsula Campaign: June 29, 1862
    Glendale (Frazier's Farm) (Seven Days Battles): Peninsula Campaign: June 30, 1862
    Malvern Hill (Poindexter Farm) (Seven Days Battles): Peninsula Campaign: July 1, 1862
    Second Bull Run (Second Manassas): Northern Virginia Campaign: August 28-30, 1862
    Antietam (Sharpsburg): Maryland Campaign: September 17, 1862
    Fredericksburg: Fredericksburg Campaign: December 11-15, 1862
    Second Fredericksburg: Chancellorsville Campaign: May 3, 1863
    Gettysburg: Gettysburg Campaign: July 1-3, 1863
    Bristoe Station: Bristoe Campaign: October 14, 1863
    Mine Run: Mine Run Campaign: November 27 - December 2, 1863

    Summary:
    The 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment had the honor of being the very first Union regiment to be raised in response to President Lincoln's call for 75,000 volunteers. Organized on April 29, 1861, the 1st Minnesota participated in all major actions of the Army of the Potomac on the Eastern Theater, with notable actions including the defense of Captain Ricketts' Battery on Henry Hill at First Bull Run, fighting in the Seven Days Battles during the Peninsula Campaign, engaging in brutal combat in the West Woods at Antietam, and, arguably their most well-known action, charging the Confederate lines in defense of Cemetery Ridge on the Second Day of the Battle of Gettysburg, where they suffered at least 82% casualties among those making the attack. The 1st Minnesota sustained one of the highest casualty rates of any Civil War regiment, and is well known for the ferocity and fighting spirit of its soldiers.

    1280px-1st_Minnesota_at_Gettysburg.jpg
    Soldiers of the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry charge the Confederate lines in defense of Cemetery Ridge at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863
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    Last edited by JDwoody; 10-17-2018 at 05:58 AM.

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    wow
    Great Find and wonderful info
    /salute
    My Great Great Grandfather, Isaac MacDonal Cooley, served as a Pathfinder Cavalry Scout
    in the 1st Arkansas Cavalry Regiment (Dobbin's) Company K
    My Avatar flies his Unit Guidon to Honor his Service.
    My Credo is a simple one ... Unit before Self with Honor above ALL else.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JDwoody View Post
    1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    1st minnesota flag.jpg

    Active: April 29, 1861 -- April 28, 1864
    Assignments:
    Various Brigades of the Army of the Potomac: Various Commanders: 1861 - 1863

    Original Command / Company Roster:

    Willis A. Gorman: Colonel
    Stephen Miller: Lieutenant Colonel
    William H. Dike: Major
    George H. Woods: Quartermaster
    Dr. J.H. Stewart: Surgeon
    Reverend Edward Neill: Chaplain

    Company A: Pioneer Guards -- Organized in St. Paul, Minnesota, on April 29, 1861. Captain Alexander Wilkin
    Company B: Stillwater Guards -- Organized in Stillwater, Minnesota, on April 29, 1861. Captain Carlisle Bromley
    Company C: St. Paul Volunteers -- Organized in St. Paul, Minnesota, on April 29, 1861. Captain William Acker
    Company D: Lincoln Guards -- Organized in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on April 29, 1861. Captain Henry Putnam
    Company E: St. Anthony Zouaves -- Organized in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on April 29, 1861. Captain George Morgan
    Company F: Goodhue Volunteers -- Organized in Red Wing, Minnesota, on April 30, 1861. Captain William J. Colvill
    Company G: Faribault Volunteers -- Organized in Faribault, Minnesota, on April 30, 1861. Captain William Dike
    Company H: Dakota Volunteers -- Organized in Hastings, Minnesota, on April 30, 1861. Captain Charles Adams
    Company I: Wabasha Volunteers -- Organized in Wabasha, Minnesota, on April 30, 1861. Captain John Pell
    Company K: Winona Volunteers -- Organized in Winona, Minnesota, on May 1, 1861. Captain Henry Lester

    List of Engagements:
    First Bull Run (First Manassas): Manassas Campaign: July 21, 1861
    Ball's Bluff (Leesburg): McClellan's Operations in Northern Virginia: October 21, 1861
    Seven Pines (Fair Oaks): Peninsula Campaign: May 31 - June 1, 1862
    Seven Days Battles: Peninsula Campaign: June 25 - July 1, 1862
    Savage's Station (Seven Days Battles): Peninsula Campaign: June 29, 1862
    Glendale (Frazier's Farm) (Seven Days Battles): Peninsula Campaign: June 30, 1862
    Malvern Hill (Poindexter Farm) (Seven Days Battles): Peninsula Campaign: July 1, 1862
    Second Bull Run (Second Manassas): Northern Virginia Campaign: August 28-30, 1862
    Antietam (Sharpsburg): Maryland Campaign: September 17, 1862
    Fredericksburg: Fredericksburg Campaign: December 11-15, 1862
    Second Fredericksburg: Chancellorsville Campaign: May 3, 1863
    Gettysburg: Gettysburg Campaign: July 1-3, 1863
    Bristoe Station: Bristoe Campaign: October 14, 1863
    Mine Run: Mine Run Campaign: November 27 - December 2, 1863

    Summary:
    The 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment had the honor of being the very first Union regiment to be raised in response to President Lincoln's call for 75,000 volunteers. Organized on April 29, 1861, the 1st Minnesota participated in all major actions of the Army of the Potomac on the Eastern Theater, with notable actions including the defense of Captain Ricketts' Battery on Henry Hill at First Bull Run, fighting in the Seven Days Battles during the Peninsula Campaign, engaging in brutal combat in the West Woods at Antietam, and, arguably their most well-known action, charging the Confederate lines in defense of Cemetery Ridge on the Second Day of the Battle of Gettysburg, where they suffered at least 82% casualties among those making the attack. The 1st Minnesota sustained one of the highest casualty rates of any Civil War regiment, and is well known for the ferocity and fighting spirit of its soldiers.

    1280px-1st_Minnesota_at_Gettysburg.jpg
    Soldiers of the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry charge the Confederate lines in defense of Cemetery Ridge at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863
    The attached thumbnail image at the bottom (the second one) is of the First Maine Heavy Artillery charging at Petersburg. The upper one is indeed the 1st Minn.
    Descendant of David Jewell - 1st Maine Heavy Artillery, Philo Johnson - 11th Vermont/1st VTHA

  6. #6

    CSA Sergeant

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    Hi! Did a fair amount of research on this unit.
    24th North Carolina Infantry
    Clarke_William_John_CSAflag.jpg


    MUSTERED IN: July 18, 1861, Weldon N.C.
    MUSTERED OUT: April 9, 1865, Appamatox Court House, V.A
    COMMANDER:COL. WILLIAM J. CLARKE
    STAFF:
    Staff.jpg
    LT.COL John L. Harris
    MAJ. THADDEUS D. LOVE
    MAJ. JOHNATHAN EVANS
    CHAPLAIN JUNIUS P. MOORE

    COMPANIES:
    A: At muster: 85 Men, primarily from Person County
    B: At muster: 120 Men, primarily from Onslow County
    C: At muster: 80 men, primarily from Johnston County
    D:At muster: 4 men (did not exist) later 61 men primarily from Halifax County
    E:At muster: 93 men, primarily from Johnston County
    F:At muster: 116 men, primarily from Cumberland County
    G:At muster: 101 men, primarily from Robeson County
    H:At muster: 105 men, primarily from Person County
    I: At muster: 92 men, primarily from Johnston County
    K: At muster: 80 men, primarily from Franklin County


    SERVICE HISTORY:

    The 24th was first numbered the 14th North Carolina Volunteers upon muster in July of 1861, numbering around 870-880 men. They were sent to join the Army of the Kanawha in mid-october after spending months in North Carolina and Virginia drilling. The army arrived too late to take part in the Battle of Carnifex Ferry, but arrived instead to help fortify Sewell Mountain against the Union army which sat opposite it. During this time, the regiment suffered dearly from an outbreak of Measles, and from this time, through their withdrawal to Petersburg into March of 1862, nearly 300 men died. They were soon replaced as the regiment was sent back to Murfreesboro, and their losses were more than made up for, bringing their strength up closer to 1000.

    SERVICE UNDER LEE:
    The 24th was transferred in the summer to Lee's Army of Northern Virginia during the Seven Days' Campaign, into Ransom's command. They took part in the Battle for White Oak Swamp on June 25th, 1862. The regiment suffered its first casualties in this fight, 7 men were killed, and around 12 were wounded as the regiment attempted to form to charge a union battery, and suffered union small arms fire. These were the first combat casualties of the 24th.

    Soon after, the 24th participated in the Battle of Malvern Hill, wherein they suffered 9 men killed and 42 wounded. They formed the rear line of Ransom's brigade as it launched one of the last assaults of the day on the right flank, along the woods. But along with the rest of the brigade, they still suffered casualties, however they were the furthrest advancing Confederate regiment that day.

    After a few months of picquet duty along the rivers of Virginia and guarding rail lines, the regiment joined the Maryland campaign. They participated in the Battle of Harper's Ferry as artillery guards for the artillery on Loudon Heights.

    The Twenty Fourth served in the Battle of Antietam under Lt.Col Harris in Ransom's Brigade, which at first guarded Snavely's Ford on the right. As reports came in of a union assault in force along the cornfield, they were moved in double-quick to the left of the battlefield, arriving about 9:30 as Confederate forces began to be pushed back through the west woods. The 24th was the leading regiment in the column, and first came under fire south of the Poffenberger buildings, victims of the 15th Massachusetts' volleys. The 24th formed against the fire they were facing, and delivered, along with other friendly forces in the area, a hail of fire which drove the 15th and the rest of the union divisions assaulting the west woods back through the north woods. The 24th pursued the union forces while their brigade wheeled right, and proceeded toward the Dunker church. Pushing onwards through the remnants of the union brigades alongside Barksdale, Early, and Semmes, the 24th encountered , coincidentally to the post above mine, the 1st Minnesota, whom they were ordered by Stuart to drive off of a stone fence angle near the Nicodemus farm, which is represented in the game. They performed a bayonet charge, and drove the 1st away from the Nicodemus farm. They were then recalled by Ransom to join the rest of the brigade in repulsing further attacks against the Dunker church, withstanding artillery fire throughout.
    The regiment lost 66 men killed and wounded at Sharpsburg.

    Following the Sharpsburg campaign, the unit retreated to northern Virginia. Here it would have wintered, save for the Battle of Fredricksburg. Here, the 24th held the far left of the Stone Wall on Marye's Heights, and suffered a fair amount of casualties, around 30, but still participated in the butchery that was this portion of the Battlefield.

    After the new year, the regiment was transferred back to North Carolina and fought a series of skirmishes before eventually being reattached to Lee's army by May 10th 1864, to join the brutal defense of Petersburg. This campaign would see the 24th at the famous Battle of the Crater, wherein a group of union soldiers attempted to rush a crater blown by tunnelers of the Union army, but the crater was too steep for a broader penetration of Confederate lines, and the 24th held one of the few routes out shut. The event was a slaughter for the Union. The luck of the unit was not to last, however, as the attack on Fort Stedman lost two full companies of the regiment as prisoners, and at Sayler's Creek, all but 54 men of the regiment surrendered, these 54 fighting on to surrender at Appamatox.


    SOURCES:


    On the statistics themselves, though, my numbers are very sketchy. I do have a question- 9 companies of the 24th show men having been wounded or killed in Sharpsburg, but if they had all showed up, that would have meant 862 men- over 1/2 of what Ransom reported his aggregate strength as having been. Did the whole company always go into battle, or was it an individual-by-individual basis?
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    Last edited by Pootis; 10-24-2018 at 02:09 PM.

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