Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: 17th Virginia Infantry Company G "Emmett Guards"

  1. #1
    Mr.Moto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    37

    17th Virginia Infantry Company G "Emmett Guards"

    The Emmet Guards and O'Connell Guards went into the 17th Virginia Infantry Regiment in June 1861 as Cos G & I; this unit subsequently served with the Army of Northern Virginia.The Emmet Guards had adopted locally made green fatigue jackets and pants in May 1861, and (like other companies in the 17th Virginia)


    After fighting at First Manassas in a brigade under James Longstreet, it was assigned to General Ewell's, A.P. Hill's, Kemper's, and Corse's Brigade. The 17th fought with the Army of Northern Virginia from Williamsburg to Fredericksburg, then participated in Longstreet's Suffolk Expedition. During the Gettysburg Campaign it was on detached duty at Gordonsville and later served in Tennessee and North Carolina. Returning to Virginia it fought at Drewry's Bluff and Cold Harbor, saw action in the Petersburg trenches, and ended the war at Appomattox.






    17th Virginia Company G "Emmett Guards"


    17th Virginia Company A "Alexandria Rifles"



    Sources:


    http://www.firstbullrun.co.uk/Potoma...-infantry.html
    "Capt. Towson's Emmett Guards have made their appearance in their new uniform, which the ladies - thanks to the skillful fingers and sewing machines, and more thanks to their noble hearts, - have gotten up in double quick time. The uniform is a green fatigue jacket, and green pantaloons, giving them quite a handsome appearance."








    The regiment was commnaded by Colonel Montgomery D. Corse and lost 13 men. Colonel Corse was again wounded, but remained in the field.

    From the War Department marker for Kemper’s Brigade on the Antietam Battlefield:

    Kemper’s Brigade reached Sharpsburg about noon September 15th and took position on Cemetery Hill. In the afternoon the Brigade moved to the ravine about 520 yards northwest of this. At noon of the 17th, the 7th and 24th Regiments were sent down the Harpers Ferry Road about 520 and 850 yards respectively, to guard the right flank. Upon the approach of the 9th Corps, about 3 P.M. the 1st, 11th and 17th Regiments advanced to the high ground in their front and met the charge of Fairchild’s Brigade; they were driven from their position and retreated through the town. They reformed with Garnett’s and Drayton’s Brigades in the Harpers Ferry Road just south of the town and, co-operated with Toombs’ Brigade, and A.P. Hill’s Division, checked the further advance of the enemy and reoccupied the ground from which they had been driven, where, joined by the 7th and 24th, they remained until the morning of the 19th, when the Brigade recrossed the Potomac.

    From Colonel Corse’s Official Report on the 17th Virginia at South Mountain:

    My regiment was placed in line of battle about 4 p. m., in a field to the right of the road leading to the summit of the mountain and to the left of Crampton’s Gap. In the act of taking that position the regiment was subjected to a very fierce shelling from a battery of the enemy about 600 or 800 yards on our right, which enfiladed our line. Fortunately however, we suffered very little loss from that, having but 2 men slightly wounded. I moved the regiment forward about 100 yards, by your orders, toward a woods in our front, and ordered Lieutenant [F. W.] Lehew, with his company, to deploy forward as skirmishers into the woods and to engage the enemy, which were supposed to be there. Very soon I heard shots from our skirmishers. Your aide, Captain Beckham, at this time delivered me an order to move my regiment by the left flank and to connect my line with the Eleventh, occupying a corn-field, which order was obeyed, when Colonel [William D.] Stuart’s regiment (Fifty-sixth Virginia), of Pickett’s brigade, joined my right. Immediately the brigade on our right became hotly engaged. We reserved our fire, no enemy appearing in our front. After the fire had continued about fifteen minutes, Colonel Stuart reported to me that the troops on his right had fallen back. I observed that they had abandoned the left of the Eleventh. I communicated my intention to Colonel Stuart and Major Clement, of the Eleventh, to fall back about 10 or 15 steps behind a fence, which was simultaneously done by the three regiments in good order. We held this position until long after dark, under a severe fire of musketry obliquely on our right flank and in front, until nearly every cartridge was exhausted.

    Shortly after the enemy had ceased firing (about 7.30 p. m.), I received your order to withdraw my regiment, which was done in good order, and halted to rest on the Boonsborough and Fredericktown road, with the other regiments of your brigade.





    The regiment was commanded by Colonel Corse and numbered only 56 men. Of these, 7 officers and 24 men were killed and wounded and 10 taken prisoner. Only seven men remained in the ranks at the end of the day: Colonel Corse was wounded for a third time, this time severely, and captured.

    About 4 p. m. the enemy was reported to be advancing. We moved forward with the 1st and 11th Regiments (the 7th and 24th being detached to operate on some other part of the field) of the brigade to the top of the hill to a fence, and immediately engaged the enemy at a distance of 50 or 60 yards, at the same time under fire from their batteries on the hills beyond. My regiment, being the extreme right on the line there engaging the enemy, came directly opposite the colors of the regiment to which it was opposed, consequently being overlapped by them, as far as I could judge, at least 100 yards. Regardless of the great odds against them, the men courageously stood their ground until, overwhelmed by superior numbers, they were forced to retire.

    I have to state here, general, that we put into the fight but 46 enlisted men and 9 officers. Out of this number, 7 officers and 24 men were killed and wounded and 10 taken prisoners.

    It was here that Captain J. T. Burke and Lieutenant Littleton fell-two of the bravest and most valuable officers of my command. Color-Corporal Harper also fell, fighting heroically, at his post. These brave men, I think, deserve particular mention.

    I received a wound in the foot, which prevented me from retiring with our line, and was left in the hands of the enemy for a short time, but was soon rescued by General Toombs’ brigade and a portion of yours, which drove the enemy back beyond the line we had occupied in the morning.

    I saw Major Herbert come up with a portion of the men of the 1st, 11th, and 17th Regiments of your brigade, on the left of General Toombs’ line, cheering the men on with his accustomed cool and determined valor.

    Lieutenant W. W. Athey, Company C, captured a regimental color of the 103rd New York Regiment, presented to them by the city council of New York City, which I herewith forward to you.

    My wound being painful, I rode to the surgeon to have it examined, leaving the command to Major Herbert..

    Last edited by Mr.Moto; 04-08-2019 at 09:54 AM.

  2. #2

    USA General of the Army

    A. P. Hill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    In Maryland State Near to both Antietam and Gettysburg, Harper's Ferry et al.
    Posts
    3,251
    Congrats!

    Welcome to the CSA! !

  3. #3
    Mr.Moto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    37
    Quote Originally Posted by A. P. Hill View Post
    Congrats!

    Welcome to the CSA! !
    Thank you

  4. #4
    Mr.Moto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    37
    @Hinkel any word yet?

    Also signature test. Does anyone know where you can make a nice banner for your signature?
    17th Virginia co. G
    https://www.warofrightsforum.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=6545&dateline=1554714  671

    "Emmett Guards"

  5. #5
    Mr.Moto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    37
    Trying to find more facts about this unit especially the uniform.
    Last edited by Mr.Moto; 04-08-2019 at 11:39 AM.
    17th Virginia co. G
    https://www.warofrightsforum.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=6545&dateline=1554714  671

    "Emmett Guards"

  6. #6

    CSA Captain

    Hienzman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    35
    I found a few links that may be useful and worth the read
    http://www.fairfaxrifles.org/history.html
    http://www.firstbullrun.co.uk/Potoma...-infantry.html
    When I get home I will pull out some books

  7. #7
    WoR-Dev Hinkel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    1,864
    Sadly, its not much likely that they still had their uniforms at the Maryland Campaign.

    Considering the clothing allowance a soldier was given and the length of time any given uniform item lasted in service, it is a pretty safe bet that most of those green uniforms worn in the spring of 1861 were gone by the summer of 1861, and a virtual impossibility that any were present a year and a half later at Antietam.

  8. #8
    Mr.Moto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    37
    Thanks, I think I found most of not all the information that could be found online. What made this unit extra special was the uniform. If there is some proof that some men still had this uniform around or during the Maryland campaign. Then it could be added to the game. It's very unlikely though. And devs stated not to add this uniform.my heart lays more with the 13th Virginia. I'm now in doubt to go back to that unit .
    17th Virginia co. G
    https://www.warofrightsforum.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=6545&dateline=1554714  671

    "Emmett Guards"

  9. #9

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •