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Thread: Pelham's Battery

  1. #11

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    Really well crafted article Chap Bradley!

    Goes to show how important artillery placement was and how mobile it could be.

    The use of 'double-canister' sounded interesting.

    Artillery ammunition statistical info was really interesting; Washington Artillery report, Capt. Overton Barret report, Gen. Magruder report. If that was historically accurate then I'm wondering if CFG will think about adjusting that precision into their game? It must have been infuriating for the artillery units in the field during the civil war. It'll be equally so for some gamers who struggle with the inaccuracy of infantry weaponry at the moment.
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  2. #12

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    Thanks for everyone's kind words and encouragement! Three weeks ago my wife and I had our first child and so the FMLA to care for my wife and newborn son, back-to-back with the COVID-19 outbreak shutting down my campus and an unusually short reading assignment for graduate school, provided an unexpected boon of free time to invest in researching Pelham's Battery and creating the graphics for this thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by RhettVito View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Tyler28256 View Post
    Can't wait for Whiting's Battery to face off against you boys!
    Now that's going to be one hell of an artillery duel.
    Whiting's Battery is unique in that it was equipped with Naval Howitzers. I love the idea of having a War of Rights showdown between J.E.B. Stuart's Horse Artillery and the 9th New York's Boat Guns.

    Quote Originally Posted by MK81 View Post
    Artillery ammunition statistical info was really interesting; Washington Artillery report, Capt. Overton Barret report, Gen. Magruder report. If that was historically accurate then I'm wondering if CFG will think about adjusting that precision into their game? It must have been infuriating for the artillery units in the field during the civil war. It'll be equally so for some gamers who struggle with the inaccuracy of infantry weaponry at the moment.
    Thank you! The report on W.A.'s lack of accuracy at the practice range was most recently published in Conquered: Why the Army of Tennessee Failed by Larry J. Daniel, who also shared this information in a previous book, Cannoneers in Gray: The Field Artillery of the Army of Tennessee, wherein he includes even more references by both Confederates and Federals to the miserable condition of Confederate ordnance. For example, on pg. 158 of the same, a Yankee at the Battle of Kennesaw wrote, "The Rebels have just finished throwing 126 shells at us, only 19 of which bursted." On pg. 74, one Confederate artillerist is flabbergasted to find his shells had been packed by arsenal employees with rifle powder. He complained, "Rifle powder is not fit for cannon, as it is so fine and burns so rapidly, that exploding all at once, it endangers the gun and the men who serve it." Tredegar Iron Works unquestionably provided Lee with better guns than Bragg or Johnston ever had, but both theatres suffered bad ammunition, namely inconsistent powder, and crappy friction primers.

    Of course this brings up the question which many of us have been wondering about: to what extent should CG pursue historical accuracy concerning artillery? Confederate shells failed anywhere between 45 to 70% of the time, by some estimates. How many gamers are so devoted to the authentic Civil War experience that they will volunteer to be the sponge rammer for a gun crew when a ⅓ of the shells handled are duds (to say nothing of the gunner's accuracy or the gun's inherent inaccuracy)? How will shells work, mechanically, anyway? Will the mouse wheel determine the fuse setting, say, scroll from 500-1,800 yards, at the limber? Many questions, very few answers.
    An unprofitable servant of Christ Jesus,
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  3. #13

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    WoR Artillery Soon™

  4. #14

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    The NPS is an excellent resource, I've used several of their brochures. Another really amazing source for general information on Civil War artillery is this video by the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. This is so good I might actually require my recruits to sit down and watch it when they've got the time to do it.

    An unprofitable servant of Christ Jesus,
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  5. #15
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    Amazing post

  6. #16

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    In this image, John Pelham and J.E.B. Stuart are depicted leaving chapel together around the time of the Battle of Fredericksburg. The two were not only close associates but very dear friends. When twenty-four-year-old John Pelham was killed participating in a cavalry charge at the Battle of Kelly's Ford on March 17, 1863, J.E.B. Stuart openly wept, remarking, "Our loss is irreparable!" Lee lamented, "I do not know how I can replace the gallant Pelham." One mourner referred to Pelham as "Alabama's noblest tribute of the whole war." J.E.B. Stuart named his daughter Virginia Pelham in honor of his fallen friend.

    Like John Pelham, I am an Alabamian. Interestingly, Pelham recruited over forty men from the state of Alabama to his battery. This means a quarter of Stuart's Horse Artillery, although technically mustered in Virginia, was comprised of Alabamians.

    Quote Originally Posted by OldGuard View Post
    Amazing post
    ˇMuchas gracias! Thanks to everyone for their encouragement!

    The battery has enlisted seven players, so we are still looking for three more volunteers before we have officially mustered.
    An unprofitable servant of Christ Jesus,
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    (My Steam) (Pelham's Bty on Company Tool) (Pelham's Bty WoR Thread)


  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbsmith7 View Post


    In this image, John Pelham and J.E.B. Stuart are depicted leaving chapel together around the time of the Battle of Fredericksburg. The two were not only close associates but very dear friends. When twenty-four-year-old John Pelham was killed participating in a cavalry charge at the Battle of Kelly's Ford on March 17, 1863, J.E.B. Stuart openly wept, remarking, "Our loss is irreparable!" Lee lamented, "I do not know how I can replace the gallant Pelham." One mourner referred to Pelham as "Alabama's noblest tribute of the whole war." J.E.B. Stuart named his daughter Virginia Pelham in honor of his fallen friend.

    Like John Pelham, I am an Alabamian. Interestingly, Pelham recruited over forty men from the state of Alabama to his battery. This means a quarter of Stuart's Horse Artillery, although technically mustered in Virginia, was comprised of Alabamians.
    Fantastic!

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbsmith7 View Post


    In this image, John Pelham and J.E.B. Stuart are depicted leaving chapel together around the time of the Battle of Fredericksburg. The two were not only close associates but very dear friends. When twenty-four-year-old John Pelham was killed participating in a cavalry charge at the Battle of Kelly's Ford on March 17, 1863, J.E.B. Stuart openly wept, remarking, "Our loss is irreparable!" Lee lamented, "I do not know how I can replace the gallant Pelham." One mourner referred to Pelham as "Alabama's noblest tribute of the whole war." J.E.B. Stuart named his daughter Virginia Pelham in honor of his fallen friend.

    Like John Pelham, I am an Alabamian. Interestingly, Pelham recruited over forty men from the state of Alabama to his battery. This means a quarter of Stuart's Horse Artillery, although technically mustered in Virginia, was comprised of Alabamians.



    ˇMuchas gracias! Thanks to everyone for their encouragement!

    The battery has enlisted seven players, so we are still looking for three more volunteers before we have officially mustered.
    Amazing thread!! A little late to the party but it really looks great, nice work and hope all is well!

  9. #19

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    CG has answered several questions about the upcoming Artillery Update. I've culled as many of these as I can from several threads on the Steam Discussion board, these forums, and the Field Report. I have rephrased a few of these questions and answers for clarity. Please understand these were not answered in an official capacity and therefore should be regarded as little more than cooler talk and idle chatter.

    Q: Will gun crews have a foreword spawn point? Such as a flag or some other type?
    A: Yes. There will be a forward battery spawn position, which can be disabled if enough enemy players are close enough to it.

    Q: Will artillerists have some sort of sidearm like a revolver, sword, or will they just use their tools as a weapon if attacked?
    A (Trusty): You can use the sponge-rammer as a club and if you are lucky you might have an artillery sword to switch to.

    Q: How many batteries will there be to choose from on release?
    A (Trusty/Hinkel): Between 40-50, a mixture of Light and Regular batteries. Horse Artillery is coming later.

    Q: What batteries might be in the initial Artillery Update?
    A (Various sources): New Jersey Light Battery (Hexamer), 1st PA Light (Matthews), Maine Light (McGilvery), 1st Rhode Island Light Artilly, Pelham's Horse Artillery, 2nd Illinois (Phillips), Ohio Light Artillery (Potts), 5th US, 1st New York Light Battery, Maryland Light Artillery, 4th US, Washington Artillery

    Q: Can arty pieces be destroyed by counter-battery fire?
    A (Trusty): Not initially.

    Q: Will type of ammunition will be in the lumber chest?
    A (Trusty): Shell, case, and canister.

    Q: How will the Artillery Update effect the Drill Camps?
    A (Trusty): Both Union and Confederate Drill Camps will be overhauled with the Artillery Update to include a firing range.

    Q: How many field pieces will be available on each map and will that number vary?
    A (Trusty): The guns per map depends on the historical positions of the batteries of the battle at the time of whatever skirmish area is active. Sometimes this means a lot of guns, sometimes only for one side and sometimes none at all.

    Q: How many Skirmish maps will feature cannons?
    A (Trusty): Artillery will be available at historical positions (if there are any) on each skirmish area.

    Q: How many players are needed to operate a field gun?
    A (Hinkel): A single soldier could operate a gun. To be flexible and fast, I would say 4 to 5 gun crew members are needed. 6 or 7 would make the gun even more effective.

    Q: To what extent is CG recreating the historical gun crew positions?
    A (Hinkel/behind the scenes footage/etc.): Batteries can spawn an officer with binoculars; a battery will benefit from a gunner to operate the elevating screw and also fill the historical role of the #3 artillerist by priming and the #4 artillerist's role by fixing and firing the lanyard; the #1 with the sponge-rammer; the #2 with the worm; someone doing part of the #3's job by canting the carriage to the left or right according to the gunner's orders. It has also been recommended that two or even three players run the limber chest. In order to move a cannon, a guncrew needs at least one person at a wheel and one person on the trail handspike.

    Q: Will accurately using shells require referencing a Table Of Fire from the limber chest?
    A (Trusty): Most likely not in the initial release. Accuracy, deadliness, etc. is something that will be built upon using the input from you guys over several artillery related updates.

    Q: What is planned after the Artillery Update?
    A (Field Guide): Artillery specific team damage punishment system (the first release of artillery will have friendly fire turned off). Chance of normal and catastrophical misfires without proper maintenance of the cannon. Dry sponge & worm tools for properly clearing stuck embers after firing. Chance of explosion when hitting the limbers. Chance of explosion when hitting the shell while it is being carried over to the gun for loading. Vent hole plugging step while loading. Fence destruction. Horse drawn artillery.


    Q: How many rounds each chest will hold?
    A (A.P.): 3 inch guns will carry 50 per chest. 12 pounders will carry 32.
    Last edited by rbsmith7; 04-24-2020 at 07:01 PM.
    An unprofitable servant of Christ Jesus,
    Chaplain Bradley
    (My Steam) (Pelham's Bty on Company Tool) (Pelham's Bty WoR Thread)


  10. #20

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    One obscure fact about Pelham's Battery is that Pelham referred to his 12-lb. Napoleon guncrew as his "Napoleon Detachment," as it was made up entirely of French Creoles from Mobile, Alabama. One veteran remembered, "in the half lull between the boom of the cannon there floated above the noise a sound that seemed strange on that day of multitudinous terrors—the Napoleon Detachment singing the Marseillaise as they fought their gun." Another writer said of the Napoleon Detachent "they were gallant fellows, and invariably in battle the voices of these men could be heard above the roar of the guns singing the Marseillaise, that stirring song that roused the man of destiny’s imperial eagles on many a gory field where the Old Guard could die, but never surrender.

    (Sorry, Hinkel, nobody on Pelham's Battery was wearing bearskin hats! )

    Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30, pg. 334; Battle Hymns: The Power and Popularity of Music in the Civil War by Christian McWhirter, pg. 223; Foreigners in the Confederacy by Ella Lonn, pg. 98.
    An unprofitable servant of Christ Jesus,
    Chaplain Bradley
    (My Steam) (Pelham's Bty on Company Tool) (Pelham's Bty WoR Thread)


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