View Poll Results: That do you think of my idea for Historical Company

Voters
103. You may not vote on this poll
  • Good Idea

    86 83.50%
  • Bad Idea

    17 16.50%
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 43

Thread: Historical company organization

  1. #1

    CSA Major

    RhettVito's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    908

    Post Historical company organization

    Historical Company Organization for Confederate and some Union Companies of the(1862) Maryland Campaign






    *Drill Links *

    18th and 19th Century United States Military Manuals for the
    General Service, Artillery, Cavalry, Infantry, Signal Corps and Navy

    *Link* http://www.storymindmedia.com/angrya...ry_manuals.htm



    Hardee's Infantry tactics
    http://www.the12thus.com/Download/Si...%20Tactics.pdf


    http://www.drillnet.net/1862/1862SotC.htm
    http://www.64thill.org/drillmanuals/...sted/index.htm


    Company Drill Animations Link
    http://www.10thpa.com/drill1.shtml

    The company officers and sergeants are nine in number, and will be posted in the following manner :. The captain on the right of the company touching with the left elbow.
    The first sergeant in the rear rank, touching with the left elbow and covering the captain. In the manoeuvres he will be denominated covering sergeant, or right guide of the company.
    The remaining officers and sergeants will be posted as file-closers, and two paces behind the rear rank.
    . The first lieutenant, opposite the centre of the fourth section.
    The second lieutenant, opposite the centre of the first platoon.
    * The third lieutenant, opposite the centre of the second platoon.
    The second sergeant, opposite the second file from the left of the company. In the manoeuvres he will be designated left guide of the company.
    The third sergeant, opposite the second file from the right of the second platoon.
    The fourth sergeant, opposite the second file from the left of the first platoon.
    The fifth sergeant, opposite the second file from the right of the first platoon.
    In the left or tenth company of the battalion, the second sergeant will be posted in the front rank and on the left of the battalion.
    The corporals will be posted in the front rank, as prescribed in No. 8.
    Absent officers and sergeants will be replaced—officers by sergeants, and sergeants by corporals. The colonel may detach a first lieutenant from one company to command another, of which both the captain and first lieutenant are absent ; but this authority will give no right to a lieutenant to demand to be so detached.


    Rank and Responsibilities

    The rank of a Civil War soldier indicated his duties and responsibilities within the
    army. The vast majority of soldiers were enlisted men—they made up the bulk of
    the fighting force. Above them were noncommissioned officers (also considered
    enlisted soldiers) and commissioned officers. While officers had more prestige
    than privates, they also carried added burdens, since they were accountable for all
    the soldiers under their command.






    Officers~


    Captain:A Captain had command of a company of infantry or cavalry, or an artillery battery
    of guns. In addition to his administrative duties, an infantry captain led his
    company into battle by giving the proper commands for the movement and
    fighting of his troops, in concert with the other companies in the regiment.

    1st & 2nd Lieutenant: Lieutenants were second in command of infantry and cavalry companies and
    artillery batteries. Infantry lieutenants assisted the company captain in their
    positions behind the line of battle by guiding the troops in their movements and
    firing

    ~Non-Commissioned Officers~

    Sergeants: :Sergeants served either in the regimental color guard or in the individual
    companies of the regiment. There could be divisions, related to administrative
    duties, within the rank—for example, first sergeant, ordnance sergeant, and
    quartermaster sergeant.
    Infantry sergeants advanced either in or behind the line of battle, depending on
    individual responsibilities. They helped guide troop movements and kept the men
    in their positions by example and force of command.

    Corporal: Corporals served either in the regimental color guard or in the individual
    companies of the regiment. During combat, infantry corporals who were not part
    of the color guard were positioned in the line of battle. They helped to keep a
    uniform line in the movement of the company. Privates looked to corporals to help
    guide them during combat.
    ~Enlisted~

    Private:Privates served as the backbone of the army and did most of the fighting in battle.
    Privates moved together shoulder to shoulder in straight battle lines and acted on
    the commands of their company officers. Privates rarely acted independently but
    rather worked as a group with the single purpose of fighting as a sheer force of
    numbers



    LEFT]Basic Combat Training

    POE[Plan of Events] { 1 hour - 1 hour 30 Mins}
    Day 1

    The first thing that you will learn in your BCT is your faces

    Left face Right face About face

    Next, you will learn the difference in between a line and a column

    After that, you will fall into ranks on the First Sergeant, Sergeant or a Corporal that is designated for the drill.

    During which you will learn the following:
    How to form a double rank line.
    To Dress:
    1. Company 2. Right (left, or center)-DRESS
    1. Company 2. DRESS ON THE COLORS (or about anything)
    Guides Left /Right
    By files left
    By files Right
    By files, half right/by files half left
    Counter march by files Left / Right
    By Company in line
    On the right by file into line
    Left /Right oblique march
    Left wheel\Right wheel
    Left Flank\ Right Flank


    Manual of Arms
    Shoulder-ARMS
    Order-ARMS
    Present -ARMS Order-ARMS
    Fix -Bayonet
    Unfix- Bayonet
    Order-ARMS
    In-Place-REST Attention. Shoulder-ARMS
    Parade-REST Attention. Shoulder-ARMS
    Right Shoulder Shift- ARMS


    POE[Plan of Events] { 1 hour -}

    Day 2
    During which you will learn the following
    To Fire by Company:
    1. Company 2. Fire by company. 3. Ready. 4. Aim. 5. FIRE! 6. LOAD
    To Fire by Rank:
    1. Company 2. Fire by rank 3.k Front or Rear rank 4. Ready 5. Aim 6. FIRE! 7. LOAD 8. Front rank 9. Ready 10. Aim 11. FIRE! 12. LOAD
    To Fire by Files:
    1. Company 2. Fire by files 3. Commence-FIRE!

    Skirmisher Drill

    1. First platoon (or second), as skirmishers. 2. On the left (right, or center) file, take intervals. 3. MARCH (or double quick, MARCH)

    Firing as Skirmishers

    When acting as skirmishers, the command to commence fire! will be given. However, there is a little more to it than just firing at will. Each file partner must work with each other to ensure that one of them is loaded or at least nearly loaded at all times. So, when the command is given to commence firing, the front rank man will fire and begin reloading. Once he is loaded, he will let his file partner know, who will then take a shot, reload, and inform the front rank man he is ready. This goes on until a cease-fire is called.

    To Advance or Retreat as Skirmishers

    To advance when in a skirmish line, the command is given:

    1. Skirmishers 2. Rise. 3. Skirmish in advance. 4. MARCH

    Bayonet Drill








    [/LEFT]








    This guide contains commonly used maneuvers and how to command them using Hardee’s Light Infantry Drill Manual. It is designed for anyone, from the newest recruit to the Colonel of the regiment, wanting a solid understanding of the manual without having to dissect the entire manual. Look at the back of this guide for command guide.

    Posts of Company Officers
    A “post” is any given position in a company.
    Captain: Right of company, touching with his left elbow.
    First Sergeant: Right of company, rear rank (behind the captain). The first sergeant is also known as the “covering sergeant” because he “covers” the captain. “Cover” simply means to be directly behind someone. The first sergeant moves into the front rank, where the captain was, if the captain steps away from the company.
    Second Sergeant: Left of company, touching with right elbow.
    All other officers are “file closers,” which means they are two paces behind the company, to keep the company together. This will be a very important role in War of Rights, due to lack of awareness and peripheral vision as well as physical contact.
    Corporals are always posted in the front rank, one on each end of the company, next to the sergeants, and one at the end of each platoon break.

    Commands
    There are three kinds of commands.
    1. The command of caution, which is attention
    2. The preparatory command, which indicates the movement about to be executed.
    3. The EXECUTION command, on which the maneuver is executed.
    Example: We are in a battle line, and we wish to march straight forward, nothing fancy. The command would be:
    1. Attention. 2. Company. 3. Forward. 4. MARCH.
    In this situation, attention company is the caution command, forward is the preparatory, and march is the command of execution.

    Forming the Company
    A company will always be formed in two ranks. There is much discussion about how to form the company, because it was never recorded in a manual, though we are given a few hints. We will practice two versions. The first is simple.
    1.Company 2. In two ranks-FALL IN
    At this command, the company simply creates two ranks forming on the first sergeant, and continues to form to his left until all men are in rank.
    The other way to form the company, which would be done starting with one rank, is as follows:
    1. FALL-IN 2. In two ranks, form company 3. Company 4. Right-FACE 5. MARCH 5. FRONT 6. In each rank, count TWOS.
    At command 1, the entire company falls in on the first sergeant, in one rank. Command 2 tells the company what they are about to do. At command 3-4, the entire company (excluding the first sergeant) faces to the right. At command 5, the man who is now facing the first sergeant will go to the sergeant’s rear, but stay right-faced. The following man will dress to the first sergeant, and the man behind him will then go to his right, to be in the rear rank when the company is fronted. This goes on until each man is either in a front or rear rank. It will look like the company has done a “in two ranks, right face.” Then the company will be formed at the command FRONT, which is a left face in this situation. The last thing to do is to count off.

    To Open and Close Ranks
    During inspections, parades, and the manual of arms, it is desirable to separate the rear rank from the front rank, giving ample space for commands to be executed without awkward movement. The company will be at ordered arms to begin with, and at the command given, the rear rank will march four paces backward, to align themselves with the first and second sergeant. The command is as follows:
    1. Attention. 2. Company 3. Shoulder-ARMS 4. To the rear open order. 5. MARCH.
    At the fourth command, the first and second sergeant will set the line for the rear rank, four paces back. At the fifth command the reaer rank will march rearward to the line set by the sergeants. Once the rear rank is aligned, the sergeants will assume their positions in the front rank.
    When the company is to be reformed, the command is simply:
    1. Rear rank. 2. Shoulder-ARMS 3. Close order 4. MARCH
    At which the rear rank will simply walk back into line.

    Dress and Guide
    The term “dress” is used to tell the company what “anchor point” they are to align themselves on. The following are the main “dresses” you should familiarize yourself with.
    1. Company 2. Right-DRESS
    On a right dress, the company aligns themselves on the first sergeant and/or captain. So basically the entire company shifts to the right until all spaces are filled.
    1. Company 2. Left-DRESS
    This is just like right dress, but to shifting down to the left.
    1. Company 2. Center-DRESS
    This dress is used when the company is operated in a regiment, with other companies. You can tell the center because that is where the colors (flags) are placed.
    1. Company 2. DRESS ON THE COLORS
    This simply means to shift towards the colors, which depending on your place in line, could be to your right or left.
    1. Company 2. DRESS ON __________________
    You can fill this blank with nearly anything, though it is typically used to dress on another company.
    The nice thing about dressing is that it is mostly, self-explanatory.
    The term “guide” simply means to base your movements according to what guide is called. For example:
    1. Company 2. Guide-LEFT
    This tells the men to stay to the left side, and to remain in line using the right side as the anchor. You can also do this on the left. The captain and first sergeant will place themselves on the right or left of the company according to what guide has been called. The company will follow the captain and first sergeant, turning when they turn, swerving when they serve. If the command is given to guide, and the captain makes a right turn, you follow, even though there was no “by files right” command given.

    Manual of Arms
    The ranks will be opened when the manual of arms is done. An asterisk is placed by the arms not yet in-game. Shoulder arms will always be done in between each position.
    Present-ARMS* Shoulder-ARMS
    Order-ARMS
    Ground-ARMS*
    Raise-ARMS* Shoulder-ARMS
    Support-ARMS* Shoulder-ARMS
    Fix Bayonet Shoulder-ARMS
    Charge Bayonet Shoulder-ARMS
    Trail-ARMS* Shoulder-ARMS
    Unfix Bayonet Shoulder-ARMS
    Secure-ARMS Shoulder-ARMS
    Order-ARMS
    In-Place-REST Attention. Shoulder-ARMS
    Parade-REST Attention. Shoulder-ARMS

    As you can see, after the two “rests” (not typically put in the manual of arms, but I went ahead and added them) the first command is attention. This brings the soldier back to ordered arms, at which point he will go to shouldered arms upon command.

    Firings

    There are multiple ways to fire at an enemy. We will begin with the basic firings, and eventually we will cover more advanced techniques like “fire by rank, by platoon.”
    First, there are three types of firings. The direct fire, which is straight ahead. The right oblique fire, which is approximately 45 degrees to the right, and its opposite, the left oblique.
    Then there are the different ways to fire: by company, by rank, by files, and at will.
    The fire by company is when the entire company gives off one volley. The command is:
    1. Company 2. Fire by company. 3. Ready. 4. Aim. 5. FIRE! 6. Load
    After a fire by company, the soldiers will remain at the ready until told to aim and fire again. In short, if you have already fired, be at the ready when reloaded.
    If you wanted to add that the company would be firing at an oblique, you would place that command right before aim, so they know where to aim.
    Next there is fire by rank, where the commanding officer will fire the two ranks separately, always beginning with the rear rank.
    1. Company 2. Fire by rank 3. Rear rank 4. Ready 5. Aim 6. FIRE! 7. Load. 8. Front rank 9. Ready 10. Aim 11. FIRE! 12. Load
    Then there is fire by files, where each file, starting from the right (always) will aim and fire. This fire can be thought of as a domino effect. After a fire by file, the company will automatically go to fire at will, which is where the individual soldier loads and fires at his own discretion, while staying in line.
    1. Company 2. Fire by files 3. Commence-FIRE!
    The fire at will following a fire by files will continue until cease fire is called. At this command, the company will load and shoulder arms.

    Facings
    The line of battle, which is the formation of a company (shoulder to shoulder, two ranks) when putting the most fire on the enemy. However, it is rather slow and difficult to march in this formation. To solve this problem, the company can use facings. A facing at its most basic definition is a stationary turn. There are left faces, right faces, about faces, and right-about faces. Facings are the sole purpose that the company counts twos.
    Right Face:
    1. Company 2. Right-FACE
    A rather simple command, but with a lot of moving parts. At this command, every soldier will face to the right, with the number 1’s standing fast, and the number 2’s moving up and two the right of the number 1’s. This creates several lines of four men all facing to the right of the company’s front. This formation is known as “column of fours.”
    A Note on Fronts
    The front is simply the battle line of a company, and the regular formation of the company (two ranks, shoulder to shoulder). On a right face, you would have to left face to get back into the company battle line, so the front is to your left. The opposite is true for a left face.
    Left Face:
    On a left face, the entire company faces to the left, with the number 2 men standing fast, and the number 1 men stepping up to the number 2 man’s left. This creates a column of fours facing left, with the company front to the right.
    Faces Without Doubling:
    If it is desired to remain in two ranks, and not create a column of fours, the command is simply:
    1. Company 2. In two ranks 3. Left (or right) 4. FACE
    There is also the about face. The about face is simply turning around 180 degrees, always turning to the right, to remain uniform.
    1. Company 2. About-FACE
    The company is now facing to its rear, this is also known as being inverted, because the front rank is behind the rear rank. The company front is behind now. To get back into the line of battle/front (with the front rank being in front of the rear rank) the command can be either:
    1. Company 2. About- FACE
    Or
    1. Company 2. FRONT
    The right about-face is the same as the about-face, but used only while already marching.

    Marching
    There are multiple ways to march, as will be covered in the following. If at right shoulder shift when halted, always bring the piece to shoulder arms. Never be standing still while at right shoulder shift unless when conducting the manual of arms.
    To march forward, in any configuration (faced or fronted):
    1. Company, forward 3. MARCH
    To make the company take a left or right 90 degree turn (while in a column of fours or column of twos):
    1. Company 2. By files left (or right) 3. MARCH
    To stop a march:
    1. Company 2. HALT
    You can also march a company at the obliques (left or right 45 degrees angle). You keep your dress in this maneuver, so the entire company is not wheeling 45 degrees, but rather each man is turned 45 degrees.
    1. Company 2. At the left (or right) oblique 3. MARCH
    If you wanted the entire company to turn, you would do what is called a wheel. A wheel is turning the company on a fixed point. You can either halt the company or command forward march once the desired direction is reached.
    1. Company 2. Right (or left) wheel 3. MARCH
    We can also maneuver the company by the flank. This can be tricky, but it is rather simple in theory. First of all, a flank is either side of you, your right or left side. While in a marching line of battle, the commanding officer may wish to do a right face (column of fours) while still marching. This is done by the command:
    1. Company 2. By the right flank 3. MARCH
    To get back into the line of battle, while still marching, you can march by the left flank, which will be like fronting the company if you were halted.
    1. Company 2. By the left flank 3. MARCH
    Now you are back in your battle line.
    If you are marching in a column of fours (being right faced/marching by the right flank) and the enemy appears on your right, it is necessary to change your front to meet them. Your front while marching by the right flank is on your left, but you wish to change it to the right. To do this, the command is:
    1. On the right, by file into line 2. MARCH
    At this command, the rear rank will halt where they are, and the front rank men will continue to march forward, and right face and continue marching onto line with the captain and first sergeant. It is important to remember your place in line in order for this maneuver to be executed well. Once the majority of the front rank is on line, the rear rank will march forward and fall into line behind their file partner (the front rank man who is always sin front of them, vice versa for the front rank man). You now have a battle line facing to what was previously your right.
    If the enemy is right in front of you while marching in a column of fours, you need to create the battle line directly in front of you. The command to do such is:
    1. By company into line 2. MARCH
    At this point, the captain and first sergeant set the position where the captain desires the battle line to be, and the column continues to march forward, each taking their position in the line of battle.

    PART II: Skirmishing

    General Principles of Skirmishing

    When executing skirmish drill, it is important to realize that the precision involved with regular company drill, or “in closed ranks,” should not be adhered to. Hardee’s states that using precision in skirmish drill interferes with the prompt execution of said maneuvers.

    When a company is sent out as a skirmish line in front of a battalion or larger, their movements should be based off what the battalion is doing. A reserve company may be placed between the battalion and the skirmish line in order to support the skirmishers and replace them if needed. It is noted that even the reserves should find cover and take it whenever possible.

    Skirmishers can carry their firearm as they please, with no regulation.

    Historically, the movements of skirmishers are commanded by bugle, though obviously, this may not be feasible in War of Rights.

    There are two ways to deploy skirmishers: on a file (forward), or by the flank (side). When skirmishing, it is crucial to subdivide the company into platoons, sections, and comrades in battle. A company can be deployed forward on its right, left, center, or any other named file; or on its right or left flank.

    When cover presents itself, TAKE IT. When deployed, it is typical that there be approximately 5-10 paces between each skirmisher, going with the lesser when on open ground.

    To Deploy Forward as Skirmishers

    When acting as an individual company and not with a regimental line, it is beneficial to deploy only one platoon as skirmishers and hold the other platoon in reserve. Of course, in many occasions, it can also be beneficial to deploy the entire company. Both methods hold the same principles, the only difference is how many men you have.

    1. First platoon (or second), as skirmishers. 2. On the left (right, or center) file, take intervals. 3. MARCH (or double quick, MARCH)

    As soon as this command is given, the 2nd Lt. and 3rd Lt. will place themselves two paces behind the first platoon, and the 5th Sgt. will place himself in front of the first platoon’s center. The 4th Sgt. will place himself on the left of the first platoon. The Captain will indicate to the 4th Sgt. where he wished him to direct. The 1st Lt. will place himself in front of the second platoon and command:

    1. Second platoon, backward 2. MARCH

    The 1st Lt. will have the second platoon march backwards three paces, and then halt. The 2nd Sgt. will place himself on the left of the platoon, and the 3rd Sgt. on the right.
    At the command MARCH, the left comrades in battle (the group of four that have the left file in it) will march straight ahead, guided by the 4th Sgt., to the spot designated by the Captain. The comrades in battle will march at an angle, at the double quick, until there is approximately 20 paces between each comrades in battle. Once the proper spacing it reached, each comrades in battle will come onto line with the comrade in battle containing the left file. The right guide will arrive with the last group of four.

    Once the line is reached and every group of four is on line, the Captain will command the skirmishers to halt. At the command halt, each group if four will automatically deploy as skirmishers. Any group not on line when the halt is given will run onto line and conform to the command. If fired open before the line is set, each group of fire can be deployed individually.

    How to Deploy as Comrades in Battle: When a group of four men is told to halt after being sent out as skirmishers, they deploy using the following maneuvers:

    1. The front rank, number 2 man remains in his place.
    2. The rear rank, number 2 man goes to the left 5 paces on steps forward onto line.
    3. The front rank, number 1 man extends right 10 paces.
    4. The rear rank, number 1 man comes onto line and extends 5 paces.

    The end result should have, from right to left observing from behind the line: rear rank 2, front rank 2, rear rank 1, front rank 1 as its order on line; with each man having 5 paces separation.

    As soon as the line is set, the NCO’s accompanying the line will fall back behind it ten paces.

    Again, if there is cover, TAKE IT. Regularity in alignment should yield to the important advantage of cover.

    While the line is formed, the 1st Lt. will take the second platoon approximately 150 paces behind the skirmish line, holding that distance until further instructed. The Captain will place himself 80 paces behind the skirmish line with a bugler and four men from the reserve platoon.

    When deploying off the right file, it is the same as the left, but inverted. The rightmost group will go straight, and the groups to the left will march at an angle. When deploying by the center file, the group with the center file will go straight, and the groups on either side will march out at an angle.

    A Note on Bayonets for Skirmishing

    Regular troops carry their bayonets in their scabbards, likewise with skirmishers. Bayonets are to be fixed only as the Captain desires.

    To Deploy on the Right or Left Flank

    Deploying on a flank is surprisingly simple, especially in light of deploying by a file. You can deploy on either the left flank or right flank. The command is as follows:

    1. Second (or first) platoon, as skirmishers. 2. By the right (or left) flank, take intervals. 3. MARCH

    At the first command, the 1st and 3rd Lt’s. will place themselves two paces behind the second platoon, and the 5th Sgt. would place himself in front of the second platoon, and the 3rd Sgt. will place himself on the right of the second platoon. The Captain will withdraw the first platoon 3 paces and halt them.

    At the command MARCH, the entire platoon but the far left comrades in battle will face to the right and begin marching. As soon as there is enough room to their right, the leftmost group will deploy. The second group, front rank number 2 man, will count 20 paces. Once the 20 paces are reached, he will call out “deploy!” and the group will face to the line and deploy. Once this is heard, the third group will begin counting, and so on.

    Once the line is set, prescribe to the postings of the deploying on a file example.

    You can even deploy on both flanks at the same time:

    1. Second platoon, as skirmishers. 2. By the right and left flanks, take intervals. 3. MARCH

    Use the same officer postings as previously used. At the command MARCH, the right section will face to the right, and the left section to the left. The comrades in battle on the right of the left section will stay stationary, and the spacing will be based off their position. The 1st and 3rd Lt’s. will guide the left section, and the 3rd and 2nd Sgt’s. will guide the right section. It is their job to ensure correct spacing.

    Extending and Closing Intervals

    The following command is used to extend a set line of skirmishers:

    1. By the left (or right) flank, ___ paces extend intervals. 2. MARCH

    At this command, the right group will stand fast while all the other groups face to the left. Each group should still have 5 paces between each man. Remember that extending is simply extending the separation between groups, not individual men.
    You use the same command to close intervals, replacing “extend” with “close.”

    Rallying

    Rallying is the term used to bring skirmishers back into either groups of four, individual sections, into platoons, as one company, or on a group, section, platoon or company.

    When a line is disturbed by scattered cavalry, the Captain should order bayonets to be fixed. If charged by cavalry, the Captain will command:

    Rally by fours!

    At this command, each four man group will return to each other as they would be in a battle line, each guarding with bayonet a different direction. If the Captain deems the groups of four to be too weak against the opposing force, the command will be given to:

    Rally by sections!

    The men will run as groups back together to form their separate sections and resume guarding with bayonets. Each section will form a square around the officers, with each section facing a different direction. If this is still insufficient, the command will be given:

    Rally by platoons! or Rally on the reserve!

    I find that the manual has the best explanation for rallying:

    “Rally by sections.
    132. At this command, the chiefs of sections will move rapidly on the centre group of their respective sections, or on any other interior group whose position might offer a shelter, or other particular advantage; the skirmishers will collect rapidly at a run on this group, and without distinction of numbers. The men composing the group on which the formation is made, will immediately form square, as heretofore explained, and elevate their pieces, the bayonets uppermost, in order to indicate the point on which the rally is to be made. The other skirmishers, as they arrive, will occupy and fill the open angular spaces between these four men, and successively rally around this first nucleus, and in such manner as to form rapidly a company circle. The skirmishers will take as they arrive, the position of charge bayonet, the point of the bayonet more elevated, and will cock their pieces in this position. The movement concluded, the two exterior ranks will fire as occasion may offer, and load without moving the feet.
    133. The captain will move rapidly with his guard, wherever he may judge his presence most necessary.
    134. The officers and sergeants will be particular to observe that the rally is made in silence, and with promptitude and order; that some pieces in each of their subdivisions be at all times loaded, and that the fire is directed on those points only where it will be most effective.
    135. If the reserve should be threatened, it will form into a circle around its chief.
    136. If the captain, or commander of a line of skirmishers formed of many platoons, should judge that the rally by section does not offer sufficient resistance, he will cause the rally by platoons to be executed, and for this purpose, will command:
    Rally by platoons.
    137. This movement will be executed according to the same principles, and by the same means, as the rally by sections. The chiefs of platoon will conform to what has been prescribed for the chiefs of section.
    138. The captain wishing to rally the skirmishers on the reserve, will command:
    Rally on the reserve.
    139. At this command, the captain will move briskly on the reserve; the officer who commands it will take immediate steps to form square; for this purpose, he will cause the half sections on the flanks to be thrown perpendicularly to the rear; he will order the men to come to a ready.
    140. The skirmishers of each section, taking the run, will form rapidly into groups, and upon that man of each group who is nearest the centre of the section. These groups will direct themselves diagonally towards each other, and in such manner as to form into sections with the greatest possible rapidity while moving to the rear; the officers and sergeants will see that this formation is made in proper order, and the chiefs will direct their sections upon the reserve, taking care to unmask it to the right and left. As the skirmishers arrive, they will continue and complete the formation of the square begun by the reserve, closing in rapidly upon the latter, without regard to their places in line; they will come to a ready without command, and fire upon the enemy; which will also be done by the reserve as soon as it is unmasked by the skirmishers.
    141. If a section should be closely pressed by cavalry while retreating its chief will command halt; at this command, the men will form rapidly into a compact circle around the officer, who will re-form his section and resume the march, the moment he can do so with safety.
    142. The formation of the square in a prompt and efficient manner, requires coolness and activity on the part of both officers and sergeants.”
    Skirmishers can also rally on the battalion, forming to them.

    Firing as Skirmishers

    When acting as skirmishers, the command to commence fire! will be given. However, there is a little more to it than just firing at will. Each file partner must work with each other to ensure that one of them is loaded or at least nearly loaded at all times. So, when the command is given to commence firing, the front rank man will fire and begin reloading. Once he is loaded, he will let his file partner know, who will then take a shot, reload, and inform the front rank man he is ready. This goes on until a cease fire is called.

    To Advance or Retreat as Skirmishers

    To advance when in a skirmish line, the command is given:

    1. Skirmishers 2. Rise. 3. Skirmish in advance. 4. MARCH

    At this command, the file partner that is loaded will bound forward a few paces and fire when his partner is ready, then his partner will bound ahead of him a few paces and continue the process. The same principles are true for retreating, but the command would be:

    1. Skirmishers 2. Rise. 3. Skirmish in retreat. 4. MARCH

    COMMAND GUIDE

    To Form the Company:
    Option A: 1. Company 2. In two ranks-FALL IN
    Option B: 1. FALL-IN 2. In two ranks, form company 3. Company 4. Right-FACE 5. MARCH 5. FRONT 6. In each rank, count TWOS.

    To Open Ranks:
    1. Attention. 2. Company 3. Shoulder-ARMS 4. To the rear open order 5. MARCH.

    To Close Ranks:
    1. Rear rank. 2. Shoulder-ARMS 3. Close order 4. MARCH

    To Dress:
    1. Company 2. Right (left, or center)-DRESS
    1. Company 2. DRESS ON THE COLORS (or about anything)

    To Fire by Company:
    1. Company 2. Fire by company. 3. Ready. 4. Aim. 5. FIRE! 6. LOAD

    To Fire by Rank:
    1. Company 2. Fire by rank 3. Rear rank 4. Ready 5. Aim 6. FIRE! 7. LOAD 8. Front rank 9. Ready 10. Aim 11. FIRE! 12. LOAD

    To Fire by Files:
    1. Company 2. Fire by files 3. Commence-FIRE!

    To Fire at Will:
    1. Company 2. Fire at will 3. Commence-FIRE!

    To Fire to the Right or Left:
    1. Company 2. Fire by (company, rank, or file) 3. Ready 4. At the (right or left) oblique 5. Aim 6. FIRE! 7. LOAD.

    To Face the Company:
    1. Company 2. Right (or left)-FACE

    To Face the Company without Doubling:
    1. Company 2. In two ranks (or without doubling) 3. Right (or left)- FACE

    To About Face the Company:
    1. Company 2. About- (or right-about if marching) FACE

    To March Forward:
    1. Company 2. Forward 3. MARCH

    To Halt the Company:
    1. Company 2. HALT

    To Turn 90 degrees (while in a column):
    1. Company 2. By files right (or left) 3. MARCH

    To March at a 45-degree Angle:
    1. Company 2. At the right (or left) oblique 3. MARCH

    To Wheel the Company:
    1. Company 2. Right (or left) wheel 3. MARCH

    To March by the Flank:
    1. Company 2. By the right (or left) flank 3. MARCH

    To Form the Line of Battle on the Right, while marching by the Right Flank:
    1. On the right, by file into line 2. MARCH

    To Form the Line of Battle Ahead of a Column:
    1. By company into line 2. MARCH



    In addition

    to the regular ranks, Civil War armies had several specialist ranks.
    Each regiment had a contingent of staff officers, which included surgeons,
    quartermasters, adjutants, and, on occasion, chaplains.
    There were also special ranks for soldiers in specific parts of a regiment, such as
    the field music (fife and drums), the regimental band (brass instruments and
    drums), and the color guard. The color guard was an honorary group chosen to
    carry the flag, or colors, of the regiment. It usually consisted of eight color
    corporals and one color sergeant.


    What are mess's? Mess's are a group of people , in this case it will be friends and this regiment will run off of this, in our past exsperience people work better together with they're friends , mess's will contain 1 sgt/2 cpl's/8 pvt's and each mess will act as 1 section and 2 sections will act as 1 platoon.

    The Sgt or the Cpl of the mess will decide a mess name such as example

    The BlueRidge Mess
    The Ratail Mess
    Mill creek Mess

    Historical Mess-Men typically combine their foods and cooking implements together usually naming there mess like one of the names above the mess usually consisted of historically speaking about 4-7 men but could be more in some cases .




    Company Officer and Senior NCO
    Cpt
    1st Sgt


    1stPlt 1st &2nd Section / Mess
    Officers
    2ndLt

    1st Section / Mess

    NCO's
    5thSgt
    1stCpl
    5thCpl

    Enlisted
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt

    2nd Section / Mess
    NCO's
    4th Sgt
    2ndCpl
    6thCpl

    Enlisted
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt

    2ndPlt 3rd &4th Section / Mess
    Officers
    1stLT

    3rd Section / Mess
    NCO's
    3rdSgt
    3rdCpl
    7thCpl

    Enlisted
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt



    4th Section / Mess
    NCO's
    2ndSgt
    4thCpl
    8thCpl

    Enlisted
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt
    Pvt




    Squad /Mess = 1 Sgt 2 Cpl 8 Pvt
    Total = 1 Cpt 2Lts 1 1st Sgt 4 Sgt 8 Cpl 32 Pvt = total 47
    1Company = 2 platoon 4 Section / Mess






    [size=14pt]*Drill Links *

    Hardee's Infantry tactics
    http://www.the12thus.com/Download/Si...%20Tactics.pdf


    Company Drill Animations Link
    http://www.10thpa.com/drill1.shtml

    http://www.drillnet.net/1862/1862SotC.htm




















    [/size]
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by RhettVito; 05-14-2018 at 07:03 AM.

  2. #2

    USA General of the Army

    Bravescot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Perthshire, Scotland
    Posts
    3,041
    How many in a regiment?

  3. #3

    CSA Colonel

    LTC Philip A. Work's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Austin Tx
    Posts
    326
    Thanks for this Rhett

    Scott usually 10, 10 companies of 100 men = 1000 man regiment. ACW regiments were always drastically reduced due to combat, illness, ect.

    Texans Always Move Them

  4. #4

    USA General of the Army

    Bravescot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Perthshire, Scotland
    Posts
    3,041
    Thank you. I thought it might be 1000 but this post threw me off a bit and confused me due to that -> Total = 1 Cpt 2Lts 1 1st Sgt 4 Sgt 8 Cpl 32 Pvt = total 47

  5. #5
    This is a great resource, thanks for compiling it.

  6. #6

    CSA Major

    RhettVito's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    908
    Quote Originally Posted by LTC Philip A. Work View Post
    Thanks for this Rhett

    Scott usually 10, 10 companies of 100 men = 1000 man regiment. ACW regiments were always drastically reduced due to combat, illness, ect.
    Your welcome

  7. #7

    CSA Major

    RhettVito's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    908
    Quote Originally Posted by armyofancients1 View Post
    This is a great resource, thanks for compiling it.
    Hope you put it to use

  8. #8

    CSA Colonel

    LTC Philip A. Work's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Austin Tx
    Posts
    326
    Quote Originally Posted by Bravescot View Post
    Thank you. I thought it might be 1000 but this post threw me off a bit and confused me due to that -> Total = 1 Cpt 2Lts 1 1st Sgt 4 Sgt 8 Cpl 32 Pvt = total 47
    I'm unsure of confederate or federal company structure but if they are both structured after current US military standards and Baron Von Steubens blue book there should be 4 platoons per company each consisting of roughly 30 soldiers

    My question for a reenactor or otherwise, what was the role of a first Sergeant during the ACW? Roughly the same as the modern us military?

    Texans Always Move Them

  9. #9

    USA General of the Army

    A. P. Hill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    In Maryland State Near to both Antietam and Gettysburg, Harper's Ferry et al.
    Posts
    3,233
    Combine this with Mr American's thread on manual of arms and your outfit should be sharp.

  10. #10

    CSA Major

    RhettVito's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    908
    thanks Gen Hill

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •